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  1. #16
    Lazy Nate505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennykyle View Post
    Oh jesus, they have one of the few jobs where you are in constant danger and still have to deal with bitchy housewives, punk teenagers, and douchy guys on a regular basis.

    As far as violating the constitution, cops that pull that stuff are the teeniest tiniest minority.
    Yeah, so do 7-11 clerks but we expect them to be civil.

    And the cops that may pull that off may be in the extreme minority, but they are covered up by many people in their profession, hence the distrust by much of the population.

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    Senior Member fishonjazz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate505 View Post
    Yeah, so do 7-11 clerks but we expect them to be civil.

    And the cops that may pull that off may be in the extreme minority, but they are covered up by many people in their profession, hence the distrust by much of the population.
    Cops are never there when i need em.... always there when i dont want them around

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    Senior Member Boondocksaint27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate505 View Post
    Yeah, so do 7-11 clerks but we expect them to be civil.

    And the cops that may pull that off may be in the extreme minority, but they are covered up by many people in their profession, hence the distrust by much of the population.
    Nate. You're usually pretty reasonable in debates. Is this coming from personal experience, or something else?

    I enjoyed the story. Nice to see things like this and the NYPD who gave the homeless guy some boots.
    Erin Go Bragh

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    Lazy Nate505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boondocksaint27 View Post
    Nate. You're usually pretty reasonable in debates. Is this coming from personal experience, or something else?

    I enjoyed the story. Nice to see things like this and the NYPD who gave the homeless guy some boots.
    Not personal experience (to be perfectly honest I've had all of two negative experiences with the police in my life, both as a teenager, and they weren't all that bad in relative terms...every other time cops have been nothing but civil to me), but if you're arguing that the blue code of silence doesn't exist (granted, the degree in which it exists can be argued) then I guess we just have to agree to disagree. Incidents like the Rodney King beating have just reinforced it in the public mind, and when cops are found to not stand up to it it builds mistrust in the public. Part of me gives cops the benefit of the doubt (or maybe to put it more accurately, I empathize with them a bit), mostly because peer pressure is (IMO) a very underrated and powerful force in any profession and walk of life. Plenty of accountants have got in trouble for either fudging the numbers for their bosses or looking the other way when it's going on. The reason why it's psychologically scarier for me when it's the police is because they do possess the power to make someone's life hell more than most other professions.

    And to be perfectly honest, maybe it's easy for me to say all this in my lower middle class home as a person who doesn't deal with cops on a regular basis or deal with their job. On a general note I do wonder that the fact that most people's experience with the police force almost exclusively is with them getting a ticket has change the public perception of the police for the worse (at least since the 50s and 60s). I remember my mom telling me that in her neighborhood there were a few beat cops who patrolled the area every day, many times on foot, and would talk to the neighbors. That has been non-existent in every neighborhood I lived in. Wonder if that's due to neighborhoods being more spread out in suburbia or something.

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    Senior Member fishonjazz's Avatar
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    As for my experiences..... I have been arrested for possesion of marijuana, and for mooning (called ludeness to the law).

    Also been given a ticket for jaywalking, and i was given an alcohol related reckless driving ticket once... the cop wanted to give me a DUI but i passed all his field sobriety tests, and blew a 0.03 on the breathalizer (i had 1 beer with dinner over a 2 hour period while watching a playoff game at a sports bar). When i went to court i asked the judge why i received the alcohol related wreckless driving ticket when the law states that i have to be over 0.08 to be breaking the law... The judge answered by saying it is up to each individual officers discretion on whether or not to write the ticket. So apparently if the police officer is racist, has something against men or women, or young people, or old people he can just write tickets for whoever the officer wants....There is no black and white letter of the law for citizens to follow, and in my opinion that gives the officer too much power.

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    Senior Member Duck Rodgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishonjazz View Post
    As for my experiences..... I have been arrested for possesion of marijuana, and for mooning (called ludeness to the law).
    Who were you mooning?

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    Senior Member fishonjazz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duck Rodgers View Post
    Who were you mooning?

    One of my friends in high school.... at my school there were 2 full time cops patrolling the school at all times and i was goofing around and mooned my friend not know that one of the cops was in the hallway a little way back.
    The wost part was that the cop yelled at me not to move and so i just stood there with my hands behind my back waiting for him and he grabbed my wrist from behind and slammed me against the brick wall, causing my head to get cup open.... Then he cuffed me and walked me to the pricipals office with my pants still down (underwear was back up at least) and sat me in a chair in the pricipals office with cuffs on and left me there.
    This same police officer maced my best friend on another occasion while my friend was laying face down on the floor with the cop kneeling on his back...... dude was total dick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate505 View Post
    Yeah, so do 7-11 clerks but we expect them to be civil.

    And the cops that may pull that off may be in the extreme minority, but they are covered up by many people in their profession, hence the distrust by much of the population.
    So you are comparing gas station clerks to cops? Good call, did HeavenHarris steal your login info?

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    Nate505 - I guess 7-11 cashiers have to walk into classrooms full of dead kids, have to see dead bodies regularly, have to walk into situations where the person they are there to get might really want to kill them, have to have ******* people chew them out for doing their job, yeah 7-11 cashiers have it rough.

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  11. #25
    Senior Member Boondocksaint27's Avatar
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    Nate, in my understanding, the landscape of Law Enforcement has changed vastly post Rodney King regarding what you are talking about. A high calls-for-service volume and being judged on your response time to those calls has done away with beat cops in everywhere but the largest of cities. Efforts are in place, at least in Utah and I'm sure elsewhere to bring back the community police mentality, like Shop-with-a-Cop at Christmastime.

    I'm not saying things don't happen. Like someone else said cops are human, but in my experience 99.5 are always trying to do the right thing. The other .5 get the media.
    Erin Go Bragh

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    Lazy Nate505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennykyle View Post
    Nate505 - I guess 7-11 cashiers have to walk into classrooms full of dead kids, have to see dead bodies regularly, have to walk into situations where the person they are there to get might really want to kill them, have to have ******* people chew them out for doing their job, yeah 7-11 cashiers have it rough.
    You're using the shootings in Connecticut to make this point? And you're asking me if HH stole my login info?

    And yes I'm equating the two jobs, at least in terms of danger and dealing with undesirable people (remember, that is the point you initially made). Both professions face danger depending on where they happen to work. I guarantee you the average Lakewood cop has never seen dead bodies on a regular basis, considering the city averages a whopping 1-2 murders a year. In fact, according to the US Dept of Labor in 2009 52 convenience store workers were killed on the job compared to 46 police officers. I have no idea of what that breaks down per capita but I doubt one is much larger than the other. And plenty of ******** blast cashiers for doing their job. That's part of the deal when doing customer service, dealing with jackasses. None of that gives cops the right to be jerks to the public (you know, the ones who are taxed so they can receive a salary), especially since none of this is exactly hidden from them when they take the job, and since nobody is putting a gun to their head and forcing them to be a cop.
    Last edited by Nate505; 12-15-2012 at 02:56 AM.

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    Lazy Nate505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boondocksaint27 View Post
    Nate, in my understanding, the landscape of Law Enforcement has changed vastly post Rodney King regarding what you are talking about. A high calls-for-service volume and being judged on your response time to those calls has done away with beat cops in everywhere but the largest of cities. Efforts are in place, at least in Utah and I'm sure elsewhere to bring back the community police mentality, like Shop-with-a-Cop at Christmastime.

    I'm not saying things don't happen. Like someone else said cops are human, but in my experience 99.5 are always trying to do the right thing. The other .5 get the media.
    I hope that's the case, and maybe it's impractical for beat cops to exist anymore, but I do believe that people not knowing cops on a personal basis and only dealing with them when they get tickets (it's been my experience that generally law abiding people only deal with them when getting caught for speeding or if they have to report something, and I'd also wager the former is more common the latter) paints a negative perception of them by the public. Maybe not a fair one, but it's easy to see that if you only deal with a certain profession and they are handing you a fine you might build some resentment towards that profession, especially if you don't have anything else to counter it with. One could also argue that by speeding you are the one responsible for the ticket, but humans have an amazing way of rationalizing things so they aren't at fault.

    And I agree, I'm guessing cops that actually break rules are the small minority. I'm more worried about the good cops who see this and don't report them. In other words it's the age old adage of 'who polices the police.' If nobody does, well, it joins together closely with another adage that 'power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.'

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    Senior Member Boondocksaint27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate505 View Post
    You're using the shootings in Connecticut to make this point? And you're asking me if HH stole my login info?

    And yes I'm equating the two jobs, at least in terms of danger and dealing with undesirable people (remember, that is the point you initially made). Both professions face danger depending on where they happen to work. I guarantee you the average Lakewood cop has never seen dead bodies on a regular basis, considering the city averages a whopping 1-2 murders a year. In fact, according to the US Dept of Labor in 2009 52 convenience store workers were killed on the job compared to 46 police officers. I have no idea of what that breaks down per capita but I doubt one is much larger than the other. And plenty of ******** blast cashiers for doing their job. That's part of the deal when doing customer service, dealing with jackasses. None of that gives cops the right to be jerks to the public (you know, the ones who are taxed so they can receive a salary), especially since none of this is exactly hidden from them when they take the job, and since nobody is putting a gun to their head and forcing them to be a cop.
    According to the LEOKA website 48 Officers were feloniously killed in the line of duty. Another 47 died as a result of accidents in the line of duty. 57,268 were assaulted in the line of duty with a 23.5 percent injury rate. I would agree with you that this gives no one the right to be a jerk to the general public, but there's more to it then just that. There are certain situations where you see something that sticks with you and then you have to turn around a few minutes later and go deal with someone whose less then pleasant and the previous situation may be on your mind (not an excuse still, but more of a reason). And believe it or not, murder aside, some crazy stuff goes down in cities both big and small.

    As to your other theory on beat cops, I think that is a part of it. I also think that the "stop-snitching" culture, certain media bias, certain frivolous lawsuits, and a myriad of other factors play a role.
    Erin Go Bragh

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate505 View Post
    You're using the shootings in Connecticut to make this point? And you're asking me if HH stole my login info?

    And yes I'm equating the two jobs, at least in terms of danger and dealing with undesirable people (remember, that is the point you initially made). Both professions face danger depending on where they happen to work. I guarantee you the average Lakewood cop has never seen dead bodies on a regular basis, considering the city averages a whopping 1-2 murders a year. In fact, according to the US Dept of Labor in 2009 52 convenience store workers were killed on the job compared to 46 police officers. I have no idea of what that breaks down per capita but I doubt one is much larger than the other. And plenty of ******** blast cashiers for doing their job. That's part of the deal when doing customer service, dealing with jackasses. None of that gives cops the right to be jerks to the public (you know, the ones who are taxed so they can receive a salary), especially since none of this is exactly hidden from them when they take the job, and since nobody is putting a gun to their head and forcing them to be a cop.
    You are equating being a 7-11 clerk to being a police officer in terms of danger? You cannot be serious. My BIL is a cop in Salt Lake, I had dinner with him Saturday night so I took the opportunity to ask him about his week. Just last week he was a first responder to 2 suicides, 1 by shotgun, 1 by hanging, a domestic violence call where the husband had a knife to his wifes throat when he got there, 1 bloody car wreck, and had to kick down the door of a drug dealer. Who the **** is blasting cashiers, they take your money and give you your change? Sounds like you are hanging out with some whiny ass douche bags. The 7-11 cashier and the cop are out to get them. Since you pay taxes to have police officers protect you, next time you get pulled over for doing something ILLEGAL, he better give you a tugjob and a scalp massage, since you pay his salary after all. Cool story bro.

  16. #30
    Senior Member TheSilencer1313's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kennykyle View Post
    Nate505 - I guess 7-11 cashiers have to walk into classrooms full of dead kids, have to see dead bodies regularly, have to walk into situations where the person they are there to get might really want to kill them, have to have ******* people chew them out for doing their job, yeah 7-11 cashiers have it rough.
    Seriously?

    Are we talking about the NYPD or are you still media stained by the elementary school incident?
    Hardly any of those things you described ever happen in the small town I live in, or the other thousands of small towns that most police patrol.

    Police departments specifically bring in Napoleon complex type individuals, with high egos for a reason.
    Most are short, fat, and were either picked on as a kid, or they were the former high school football fathead looking to relive his glory days.
    "If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around them will deprive the people of all property until their children wake up homeless on the continent their Fathers conquered." - Thomas Jefferson

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