Coronavirus in China

Jazz4ever

Well-Known Member
In an interview today, it’s pretty clear that Trump is quasi-blaming everyone else. Look at this word salad:

"I don't agree with the statement that if everybody wears a mask everything disappears," Trump said. "Dr. Fauci said don't wear a mask, our Surgeon General, terrific guy, said don't wear a mask. Everybody was saying don't wear a mask. All of a sudden everybody's got to wear a mask, and as you know, masks cause problems too, with that being said, I'm a believer in masks. I think masks are good."
This is disingenuous from Trump, as Fauci only said that because of the shortage of personal protective equipment at the time.
 

Avery

Well-Known Member
Like April! Next April! Or the April after that?! LOL.
It could be April, it could be June, I love June, I got married in June, beautiful month, but I’ll tell you this, and I’ll only say it once, but one month, and it could be June, could be Monday, but it will disappear and go away and everything will be spectacular. It’s a terrible thing but it will be beautiful when it goes away and everything will be back overnight and we will be itching to go and in full swing of the greatest rebound in the world history of historical worlds.
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
It could be April, it could be June, I love June, I got married in June, beautiful month, but I’ll tell you this, and I’ll only say it once, but one month, and it could be June, could be Monday, but it will disappear and go away and everything will be spectacular. It’s a terrible thing but it will be beautiful when it goes away and everything will be back overnight and we will be itching to go and in full swing of the greatest rebound in the world history of historical worlds.
Haha well done
 

Jonah

Well-Known Member
Apologies if this has been posted before. I went back a number of pages and couldn’t find anything. It’s a tragic and heartbreaking column by Michelle Goldberg in the NY Times from last week and well worth quoting at length:

"If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned."

"It’s coming back elsewhere too. Taiwan, where most days this month no new cases have been reported, just held the Taipei Film Festival, and a recent baseball game drew 10,000 spectators. Italy was once the epicenter of Europe’s outbreak and remains in a state of emergency, but with just a few hundred new cases a day in the whole country, bars are open and tourists have started returning, though of course Americans remain banned. According to The New York Times’s figures, there were 321 new cases in all of Canada last Friday."

"And America? We had 68,241. As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida. The world is closed to us; American passports were once coveted, but now only a few dozen nations will let us in. Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, told me he doesn’t expect American life to feel truly normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump.”

"Gostin was part of the international panel that put together the Global Health Security Index, a report, released last year, that evaluated the pandemic readiness of every nation on earth. No country, they found, was as prepared as the United States. But the coronavirus, he said, has shown us that “health system capacity alone is almost useless unless you have a government that can unleash that capacity promptly and consistently.”

The column in its entirety can be found here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/...vCaWvJFKB98vOzrGkCXyyiBrFC1jT45nBdRPpJRV-N7Y0
 

NAOS

Well-Known Member
In an interview today, it’s pretty clear that Trump is quasi-blaming everyone else. Look at this word salad:

"I don't agree with the statement that if everybody wears a mask everything disappears," Trump said. "Dr. Fauci said don't wear a mask, our Surgeon General, terrific guy, said don't wear a mask. Everybody was saying don't wear a mask. All of a sudden everybody's got to wear a mask, and as you know, masks cause problems too, with that being said, I'm a believer in masks. I think masks are good."
Trump’s whole worldview is closed to the idea that we’ve learned something about this NOVEL virus since March.
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
Apologies if this has been posted before. I went back a number of pages and couldn’t find anything. It’s a tragic and heartbreaking column by Michelle Goldberg in the NY Times from last week and well worth quoting at length:

"If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned."

"It’s coming back elsewhere too. Taiwan, where most days this month no new cases have been reported, just held the Taipei Film Festival, and a recent baseball game drew 10,000 spectators. Italy was once the epicenter of Europe’s outbreak and remains in a state of emergency, but with just a few hundred new cases a day in the whole country, bars are open and tourists have started returning, though of course Americans remain banned. According to The New York Times’s figures, there were 321 new cases in all of Canada last Friday."

"And America? We had 68,241. As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida. The world is closed to us; American passports were once coveted, but now only a few dozen nations will let us in. Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, told me he doesn’t expect American life to feel truly normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump.”

"Gostin was part of the international panel that put together the Global Health Security Index, a report, released last year, that evaluated the pandemic readiness of every nation on earth. No country, they found, was as prepared as the United States. But the coronavirus, he said, has shown us that “health system capacity alone is almost useless unless you have a government that can unleash that capacity promptly and consistently.”

The column in its entirety can be found here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/...vCaWvJFKB98vOzrGkCXyyiBrFC1jT45nBdRPpJRV-N7Y0
interesting. Thanks for writing this!
 

Red

Well-Known Member
Apologies if this has been posted before. I went back a number of pages and couldn’t find anything. It’s a tragic and heartbreaking column by Michelle Goldberg in the NY Times from last week and well worth quoting at length:

"If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned."

"It’s coming back elsewhere too. Taiwan, where most days this month no new cases have been reported, just held the Taipei Film Festival, and a recent baseball game drew 10,000 spectators. Italy was once the epicenter of Europe’s outbreak and remains in a state of emergency, but with just a few hundred new cases a day in the whole country, bars are open and tourists have started returning, though of course Americans remain banned. According to The New York Times’s figures, there were 321 new cases in all of Canada last Friday."

"And America? We had 68,241. As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida. The world is closed to us; American passports were once coveted, but now only a few dozen nations will let us in. Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, told me he doesn’t expect American life to feel truly normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump.”

"Gostin was part of the international panel that put together the Global Health Security Index, a report, released last year, that evaluated the pandemic readiness of every nation on earth. No country, they found, was as prepared as the United States. But the coronavirus, he said, has shown us that “health system capacity alone is almost useless unless you have a government that can unleash that capacity promptly and consistently.”

The column in its entirety can be found here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/...vCaWvJFKB98vOzrGkCXyyiBrFC1jT45nBdRPpJRV-N7Y0
Yeah, the whole world is watching, and the whole world is slack jawed at how our nation has responded to this crisis:

 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
LOL, wut???

“He’s just so thought provoking!”


My goodness, the American response has been a disaster. Both the substance of Donald’s policy and messaging. Ben Shapiro is a complete dumbass.
 

Avery

Well-Known Member
The case to death ratios being reported vary so much amongst states that I question the right number. NY was always so high yet Florida is having more people test positive but far fewer deaths. Of course, general 'flu' deaths are also 4x in many of these states which seems to be a not so subtle anomaly.

I fear that none of us will be able to truly understand the statistics around this.
 

infection

Well-Known Member
Staff member
2018 Award Winner
2019 Award Winner
The case to death ratios being reported vary so much amongst states that I question the right number. NY was always so high yet Florida is having more people test positive but far fewer deaths. Of course, general 'flu' deaths are also 4x in many of these states which seems to be a not so subtle anomaly.

I fear that none of us will be able to truly understand the statistics around this.
NY and NJ account for 1/3 total COVID deaths in the US. Most of this was in nursing homes. Plus the debacle of sending positive patients back to nursing homes. Nursing homes are under much more strict requirements now than they were then. Nursing homes will not take a patient (any patient) without a negative COVID test, and even then they often quarantine them within the facility upon arrival. People can’t even see their families. If you’ll remember, everyone complained about not enough testing back in March and April. We’re currently running about a million tests per day. I’ll post more later but I’ve gotta run for the moment.
 

infection

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Staff member
2018 Award Winner
2019 Award Winner
Okay, so getting back to this... serological studies indicated that as of June, about 25% of New York City had COVID. That's 2 million people. Now consider that New York State only has 434k confirmed cases. Now we're running massive testing and it's distorting the picture for everyone. Absolutely nowhere is like New York, but because we're getting all these positive tests back, we're seeing the amount of positive cases exceeding that of NY back during their peak, and we're making the assumption that this is the same thing or worse. I can't find the graph right now, but if you actually look at the curves of deaths per capita over time, NY has a huge spike and tails off. Absolutely no other state that everyone is panicking about has any kind of spike. They trend up in a slow, flat line. But the difference is drastic. I'll have to find it.

Anyway, for all the discussion about how bad off the US is, here's a per capita breakdown of deaths for COVID:51C269E3-8713-4F13-8FE9-D197373523C8.png

The main reason I link this graph is for a country comparison. However, it is worth noting that the largest component that makes up the US' death curve is due to what happened in the northeast when this all got rolling. My point isn't to make this political, as I think simplistically laying blame at the feet of Cuomo lacks nuance (but does warrant discussion). When COVID hit, it was like game 1 of the playoffs. Sure, you can go into it with a plan, but as soon as you play that first game, you realize (in hindsight) that there were perhaps some glaring holes in your game plan that perhaps were simple to fix. Forcing COVID+ patients back to nursing homes is a massive blunder. But I'm willing to judge that from that place in time rather than by hindsight. Obviously, even given that context, it's still problematic, but these are live situations and lay society has this inborn belief that bad things don't happen, and when bad things happen the explanation is some kind of villain causing something unnatural. But that's just often not the case. And then there's the reality that New York is one of the most highly densely populated areas in the entire world. So, you could certainly play politics here, but it lacks nuance. I'm sure everyone would agree with me on that to some extent. But I don't think people would agree with that regarding any of these other states that are nothing like New York that we're currently playing politics with. Nobody wants nuance. Nuance is a one-way street.

So, there's COVID discussion, and then there's discussion as if we're watching a Marvel movie, where there's a team of heroes going up against a team of villains. I like good COVID discussion. Too much it looks like everyone's talking about a movie, and they're at the midnight showing dressed up as their favorite character.
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
Hopefully after the kids get over the virus they will also be able to get over their parents or grandparents deaths just as easily.

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Exactly.

I mean that governor’s juvenile thinking explains so much. It’s no wonder why we can’t get this virus under control or provide desperate workers and businesses the financial aid that they need.

These people are our leaders? SMH...
 

infection

Well-Known Member
Staff member
2018 Award Winner
2019 Award Winner
@infection I am starting to hear more and more about anecdotal evidence showing that that insuffcient levels of vitamin D will make covid symptoms much worse. Have you heard or read anything about this?
Yes. I haven't dug into it much, but my immediate suspicion is that low vitamin D is going to be a marker for underlying disease and lifestyle that doesn't mix particularly well with COVID.
 
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