Coronavirus in China

latin jazz

Well-Known Member
For all of you interested, I've been listening to an MIT seminar about Covid & cities, including a pretty interesting presentation on epidemic spreading through public transit. Some of these are a bit nerdy. You can subscribe here: https://achegut.typeform.com/to/PVeUgGRK

It´s free.

Next set of presentations are on Aug 13, about the impact of covid on real state.
 

candrew

Well-Known Member
First time I've played in a pick-up game since March and I end up guarding Jack Ryan (NYC street ball legend, they did a 30 for 30 about him).

Got off light - he only humiliated me once.
 

candrew

Well-Known Member
Hope nobody is married to seeing football this season. If MLB is any indication, it’s going to be a gong show.
Call me overly cynical but it seems clear they cancelled the preseason because they probably think they couldn't get 4 games it.

This is a pure money grab. Getting in two or three weeks of the regular football season is better than nothing.
 

Jazz4ever

Well-Known Member
Which is why you should never use one source of media for all your news intake. I try and read stories from many organizations to try and get a more centralized view. Yes, that means reading Fox News as well as CNN and also tossing in smaller online-only periodicals. It helps let you make your own informed opinions as often-times, the answer may lie somewhere in the middle.

Always a pleasure seeing how the same piece of news gets portrayed depending on who tells the story.
Fox had Chris Wallace interviewing the democratic VP candidates today. As usual he asks tough, but fair, questions to both parties. Refreshing.
 

fishonjazz

Well-Known Member
Contributor
2018 Award Winner
2019 Award Winner
Fox had Chris Wallace interviewing the democratic VP candidates today. As usual he asks tough, but fair, questions to both parties. Refreshing.
Who did you like the best?
Also, Michelle Obama wasn't one of them was she? My mother in law told my wife that Michelle Obama might be VP and I haven't heard anything about that.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
 

Jazz4ever

Well-Known Member
Who did you like the best?
Also, Michelle Obama wasn't one of them was she? My mother in law told my wife that Michelle Obama might be VP and I haven't heard anything about that.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
Bass came across as being well spoken, intellectually honest, and didn't side step any questions. I haven't heard anything about Obama being in the mix.
 

candrew

Well-Known Member
Who did you like the best?
Also, Michelle Obama wasn't one of them was she? My mother in law told my wife that Michelle Obama might be VP and I haven't heard anything about that.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
No doubt in my mind it's taken as long as it has to select a VP because they're begging MO on a daily basis to take the job.

She accepts VP it's game, set, match for Biden.
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member

Uh oh... if they’re writing this then you know things are bad at the FDA. I have zero confidence that trump won’t corrupt it just as he’s corrupted every other institution.
 

stitches

Well-Known Member
Russia has approved their vaccine without completing Phase 3 clinical trials:


Russia is the first country to approve a vaccine, and its announcement raises fears that the country is rushing for political purposes. The number of virus cases worldwide has now passed 20 million.

A Russian health care regulator has become the first in the world to approve a vaccine for the coronavirus, President Vladimir V. Putin announced on Tuesday, though the vaccine has yet to complete clinical trials.

The Russian dash for a vaccine has already raised international concerns that Moscow is cutting corners on testing to score political and propaganda points.
Mr. Putin’s announcement came despite a caution last week from the World Health Organization that Russia should not stray from the usual methods of testing a vaccine for safety and effectiveness.

Mr. Putin’s announcement became essentially a claim of victory in the global race for a vaccine, something Russian officials have been telegraphing for several weeks now despite the absence of published information about any late-phase testing.

“It works effectively enough, forms a stable immunity and, I repeat, it has gone through all necessary tests,” Mr. Putin told a cabinet meeting Tuesday morning. He thanked the scientists who developed the vaccine for “this first, very important step for our country, and generally for the whole world.”

Mr. Putin also said that one of his daughters had taken the vaccine.
...


But the Russian scientific body that developed the vaccine, the Gamaleya Institute, has yet to conduct Phase III tests on tens of thousands of volunteers in highly controlled trials, a process seen as the only method of ensuring a vaccine is actually safe and effective. Around the world, more than 30 vaccines out of a total of more than 165 under development are now in various stages of human trials.

Vaccines generally go through three stages of human testing before being approved for widespread use. The first two phases test the vaccine on relatively small groups of people to see if it causes harm and if it stimulates the immune system. The last phase, known as Phase III, compares the vaccine to a placebo in thousands of people. This final phase is the only way to know with statistical certainty whether a vaccine prevents an infection. And because it’s testing a much larger group of people, a Phase III trial can also pick up more subtle side effects of a vaccine that earlier trials could not.
...
Russia’s minister of health, Mikhail Murashko, has said the country will begin a mass vaccination campaign in the fall, and said on Tuesday that it would start with teachers and medical workers this month.

Calling it a world first, President Putin said the vaccine, developed by Moscow's Gamaleya Institute, offered "sustainable immunity" against the coronavirus.

He said he knew the vaccine was "quite effective", without giving further details, and stressed that it had passed "all needed checks".
...
Russian scientists said early-stage trials of the vaccine had been completed and the results were a success.

The Russian vaccine uses adapted strains of the adenovirus, a virus that usually causes the common cold, to trigger an immune response.
...
But the vaccine's approval by Russian regulators comes before the completion of a larger study involving thousands of people, known as a phase-three trial.

Experts consider these trials an essential part of the testing process.

Despite this, Russian Health Minister Mikhail Murashko said on Tuesday the vaccine had "proven to be highly effective and safe", hailing it as a big step towards "humankind's victory" over Covid-19.


Russia is fast-tracking its Covid-19 vaccine at an extraordinary pace. It began the first clinical trials on 17 June, months after teams in China, the US and Europe.

Unlike other groups, the Gamaleya Institute in Moscow has not released any safety or immunity data from its studies. This makes it impossible for independent scientists to make an assessment.

President Putin is keen to send a clear message to the world regarding the prowess of Russian science. But simply being first is not enough.

No Covid-19 vaccine being developed has yet been shown to offer protection against coronavirus. That central question remains unanswered.

...

The progress Russia says it has made on a coronavirus vaccine has been met with scepticism by health officials and media outlets in the US and Europe.

Last month, America's leading infectious diseases expert Dr Anthony Fauci expressed doubts about the rigour of the testing process in fast-track vaccine efforts in Russia and China.

WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier has echoed those sentiments, telling reporters on 4 August: "Sometimes individual researchers claim they have found something, which is of course, as such, great news.

"But between finding or having a clue of maybe having a vaccine that works, and having gone through all the stages, is a big difference."

Meanwhile the Moscow-based Association of Clinical Trials Organizations (Acto), which represents the world's top drug companies in Russia, urged the health ministry to postpone approval until after phase-three trials.

Acto executive director Svetlana Zavidova told the Russian MedPortal site that a decision on mass vaccination had been carried out after a combined first- and second-phase tests on 76 people, and that it was impossible to confirm the efficacy of a drug on this basis.

I don't know how to feel about this... this indeed seems like more of a political move. I hope that vaccine is safe and effective indeed. It's possible my country might procure some of those vaccines relatively early and I don't know if I'd be willing to take it, although... maybe I'd be OK with it going for my mom(who is a nurse, a lifelong smoker and close to 60)...
 

LogGrad98

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Russia has approved their vaccine without completing Phase 3 clinical trials:








I don't know how to feel about this... this indeed seems like more of a political move. I hope that vaccine is safe and effective indeed. It's possible my country might procure some of those vaccines relatively early and I don't know if I'd be willing to take it, although... maybe I'd be OK with it going for my mom(who is a nurse, a lifelong smoker and close to 60)...
I hope the russian vaccine is all good. A bad vaccine can be worse than the disease itself.
 
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