Drug Deaths

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Stoked, Jun 2, 2019.

  1. Stoked

    Stoked Well-Known Member Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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  2. Gameface

    Gameface All-Jazzfanz First Team! Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    First thing first...

    Opioids are what heroin is.

    Your "fun" prescription painkiller is an opioid. It is what heroin is.

    So best thing to do is to tell your doctor you don't want a prescription for an opioid. They have their place, but just ask yourself if you want a little heroin today, and if the answer is yes, better a little heroin than the pain I'm in, then take them. But understand that for chronic pain, or for an injury that is going to cause pain for an extended period of time, if you take opioids to relieve that pain you are on low dose heroin and there is a significant possibility of dependency (fancy way of saying low-level addiction).

    If you have pain killer prescription medication and you are sometimes taking more, and especially if you sometimes take significantly more than the prescribed dose over time, you stand a good chance of becoming addicted. If you want a cheap way of getting the same thing once your prescription runs out heroin is a direct substitute. If you start using heroin but that starts not pushing your buttons hard enough fentanyl is a great way to have an overdose and die.

    Many people are seeking out fentanyl for that little extra high and dying.

    Is is REALLY EASY to overdose and DIE on fentanyl. Like so easy a caveman can do it type easy.

    If you ever find yourself thinking fentanyl is an option for you please understand you are choosing possible death.
     
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  3. Gameface

    Gameface All-Jazzfanz First Team! Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    But I'm not trying to lay blame on the people addicted to opioids.

    I have known MANY people who had an injury, went to the doctor and over the course of their treatment developed a dependency and/or addiction to opioids. Many times when the patient had no understanding at all of the addictive nature of the "medicine" they were prescribed.

    Things are changing now, and it is much less likely your doctor will hook you up with a little opioid prescription when it's not really needed. They have their place, but that place is MUCH smaller than the place they have had over the last 20 or so years.
     
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  4. JazzGal

    JazzGal Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I work in law enforcement and see drug addicts and their destroyed lives every day. And I have no idea where the answers lie. But I believe the US made the wrong choice when they decided jail/prison was the answer instead of spending the resources on treatment. They are now trying to correct that error.

    Be careful out there. Find alternative methods for pain relief and coping. The price you pay otherwise is too high. (pun not intended)

    Sent from my moto z3 using JazzFanz mobile app
     
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  5. Stoked

    Stoked Well-Known Member Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    I agree that mass incarceration is not the way to go.

    I’d love to see the government order an in depth study of the top 10 recovery centers in the US and see what they do along with the how and why they do it. Then come up with a nationwide plan to assist addicts and the mentally ill.

    We also need justice reform that has language focusing drug addicts and mental health.

    Push rehab centers, job/skill training, therapy and community service as opposed to incarceration.

    It’s never going to be completely gone but the trend is swinging upward dramatically and that’s a massive problem.

    These are the kind of things I’d want to spend money on.
     
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  6. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    Good post.
    One time I was at the bar with some friends and one of them had a fetanyl patch. He asked me if I wanted to eat it with him. I'm usually down for whatever so I said yes. So we ripped it open and are the gel inside. About 15 minutes later I was feeling pretty good and I asked him if we could eat some more.
    He was an oxy addicted daily opiod user and he was like **** no we shouldn't eat more. Wait a few more minutes and see how you feel.

    Next thing I know I can't stand up and I'm puking in the bar and being helped out to the car.
    I laid on the floor of the back seat of the car until I passed out and slept there all night.

    That's probably the most powerful drug I ever did and I have done most all of them.

    Don't **** with fetanyl

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  7. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I definitely needed some opioids when I had kidney stones.

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  8. Eenie-Meenie

    Eenie-Meenie Well-Known Member

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    I've read that CBD oil is good for pain, but I suspect that's only for mild, arthritis-type pain. Has anyone here used it for pain?
     
  9. Saint Cy of JFC

    Saint Cy of JFC Well-Known Member

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    Most people don't choose to take fetanyl. It's usually used to lace other drugs because it raises profit margins and users don't know
     
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  10. Red

    Red Well-Known Member

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    I use both an opiate patch, Butrans, and Vicodin, for chronic pain. The condition I have is known as DISH, which is an acronym. Basically, for nearly 2 years, my chronic pain was so bad, I was bedridden for about 80% of my waking hours. Lying on my side in bed was my only escape from terrible pain. And I have had kidney stones numerous times, so I'm on pretty familiar terms where pain is concerned.

    Tried everything, physical therapy, massage therapy, trigger point injections, before my doctor and I decided on pain management. I wanted my quality of life back. Simple as that. Made that decision in Dec., 2012. But, everything was, and is, on a "as needed" basis. Eventually, I got to the point where I stopped using Butrans or Vicodin for weeks, and months, at a time. And when I have bad stretches, I use them. Addiction or dependency has simply never been a problem for me. If needed, I use them. If the pain is bearable, I don't use them.

    If people think fentanyl is bad(in the states, it first appeared here in Rhode Island, and the first people to die in the states from fentanyl died here), check out Krocodil, which I understand originated in Siberia. Here are a couple of articles, but a warning is in order. What this does to the bodies of people who use it is incredible, and these photos are gruesome. This is the latest opiate, and it likely makes fentanyl seem like taking an aspirin, in comparison. Saw a program about Krocodil on National Geographic about a month ago, and could not believe anyone would do this to themselves.

    https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/horrific-injuries-caused-flesh-eating-13959670

    https://www.cnn.com/2013/10/16/health/krokodil-zombie-drug/index.html
     
  11. candrew

    candrew Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to abuse of opioids I don't think it's a pain management issue, it's a mental health management issue.

    While they may have started taking opioids because of some pain issue, the folks that get hooked on this stuff are suffering from some type of undiagnosed clinical depression.
     
  12. Stoked

    Stoked Well-Known Member Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    Not sure what the stats are on that but I fully believe that mental health issues (depression, bi-polar, anxiety, schizophrenia...) plays a roll in the use and addiction of drugs.
     
  13. candrew

    candrew Well-Known Member

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    I had two kidney stone attacks in my life - the first one lasted 9 days.

    The pain is indescribable - my doctor prescribed something called dilaudid, which is 14X more powerful than morphine and it did absolutely nothing.

    After the second one I gave up caffeine and I haven't had one since (almost 4 years). Though believe it or not it's genetic - I'm not sure if anything will do any good long term.
     
  14. Rubashov

    Rubashov Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

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    NEVER!!!!!!
     
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  15. Rubashov

    Rubashov Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

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    Controls on opioids were increased here I reckon 10 to 12 years ago, codeine can no longer be purchased without prescription. We had a significant heroin problem in this country in the late 80's through the 90's but it has largely been displaced by meth addiction amongst the addicts that I work with daily. The typical heroin addict that i see at work is 40+, generally fairly well acquainted with her majesty's prison service and generally well on the margins of society. Most IV drug users under that age that I come in contact with are injecting Meth, there has over the last couple of years been an increase in opioid and benzo use by this cohort of younger addicts in order to sleep or 'come down' but meth is still by a distance the drug of choice for young Australians.
     
  16. The Thriller

    The Thriller Well-Known Member

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    This issue is three tiered:

    1. Political
    2. Financial
    3. Racial

    1. Politicians, prosecutors, and law enforcement won’t want to be seen as “going easy” on drug offenders. It’s much more politically advantageous to throw the book at those addicted to drugs than to offer treatment. Attitudes are changing but very slowly.

    2. Health care and law enforcement are some of the biggest money makers in the nation. Health care should be one of the most regulated industries out there. Unfortunately, we have an incredibly unregulated health care system comparatively. As a result, big pharm pays doctors big time money to prescribe their most expensive (and addicting) drugs. Big pharm has fought for years to keep marijuana illegal (and still are. Look at how complicated things have gotten in utah). So tackling big pharm to stop trying to exploit doctors and desperate patients is going to take some real political reform in our country. Advancing a single payer system would go a long way to resolving this. But we’re years away from that.

    3. Racially, no one of importance gave a **** for decades over these addicting drugs rampaging through African American communities in the 70s and 80s. In fact, it was more lucrative to ignore the problem and lock them up. Now suddenly, now that Joe Sixpack in Ohio is addicted to this ****, are people finally starting to pay attention? So attitudes regarding race are going to have to change if we are to truly tackle this problem and get communities devastated by this epidemic the help they need.
     
  17. candrew

    candrew Well-Known Member

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    LOL - it wasn't easy. Serious withdrawals. Did a lot of running - not sure if it helped any.
     
  18. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I thought I was dying. It was a 10 millimeter son of a bitch. Morphine didn't even have an effect at all. Pain pills didn't do anything. Only thing that worked for me was toradol (I think that's what it was called but my brain wasnt working well due to the pain.) but I only had that at the hospital. Had to wait like 5 days before I could get surgery on the stone. Those 5 days were pretty bad.

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  19. Harambe

    Harambe Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I really like how they're putting access to treatment and recovery services out there.

    I feel like we might be over-correcting with how we attack prevention. As others have outlined, there are times where it's absolutely justified(Surgeries, Cancer, etc). More and more I see and hear stories of doctors refusing to write out a script, yet not getting their patient to a pain management professional for assessment. This leaves the patient disenfranchised with their doctor, looking for relief on the street.
     
  20. Scat

    Scat Well-Known Member

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    Anyone here ever try kratom?
     

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