LENR: why planet earth is nowhere near an energy crisis

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by babe, Jul 10, 2019.

  1. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    Low Energy Nuclear Reactions. LENR.

    That's what "Cold Fusion" is called today.

    Under conditions of forced close contact, two nuclei of Deuterium (isotope of hydrogen, enriched in oceans) combine to form Helium, with favorable release of energy.

    Once detected in palladium electrodes, unreliably..... is now more reliably done... in special alloys of known composition. Unreliable palladium electrodes with variable trace elements.... now being produced in standard, controlled composition.

    Not going to be as "clean" as plasma fusion, though. Just more practical. And maybe some won't mind the trace by-products so much.... pretty standard minerals of low toxicity//// hopefully, that is.

    The field is new, wide open. Very few investors so far.

    "heavy water" with lots of deuterium is believed to be abundant in deep ocean trenches, at any greater depth, due to gravity and density facts. Presently, deuterium is produced from ordinary water at great expense, like Uranium is enriched..... and companies who do it must have AEC licenses. It has nuclear application in hydrogen bombs....
     
  2. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    So I have casually followed it from the announcement decades ago. Just talking to one of the early researchers, I casually guessed the issue causing the inconsistent results. Some of my own work experience with metals.... a smattering of metallurgical knowledge.... and Viola!!!!! Of course, it was a trace constituent in the Palladium electrodes which was just ignored as a trivial impurity.... but which is widely known as a hardening agent in metals. Berylllium.

    Now, researchers insist on a standard content of this element in their electrodes. But research has gone on to other materials as well. A lot of metals have the spacing in their crystal lattice for Deuterium to pack into it under pressure/electrostatic forces. Resistance to corrosion is a key. Beryllium is often added to alloys to confer corrosion resistance.

    Other tactics are being explored, lots of truly novel approaches.....
     
  3. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    A project with international government support is under way in France, ITER, proposing to develop LENR for deuterium/tritium reaction in a low-temp plasma something like you could do with a cyclotron or particle accelerator. The method is direct, high energy impact....
     
  4. str8line

    str8line Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner

    7,121
    2,036
    263
    Nov 22, 2013
    upload_2019-7-10_14-24-21.png
     
    Zombie likes this.
  5. Carbon13

    Carbon13 Well-Known Member

    2,005
    211
    98
    Dec 18, 2014
    Very nice
     
  6. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    The grudging, reluctant recognition of LENR is inescapable. For example, recent research into the Earth internal heat generation has found that only about half of the heat generated deep inside planet earth can be attributed to uranium, thorium, potassium or other fissionable species...… and the comments are running out about whether the "missing" source of the heat can be LENR reactions....

    I think so. Although the temperatures in the core are pretty high, not as high a plasma temps in hydrogen reactors, and the elements involved might not be hydrogen..... but fusion of various possible nuclei yielding higher elements.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  7. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    So, for beginners…. and me, for that matter.... here is a current item.

    Google's Big Bucks folks are wanting to revive this subject.... here is their report.

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/...ns-elusive-these-scientists-may-revive-quest/
    yah yah..... I didn't invent anything. I knew something about metallurgy.

    I said this to one of the early researchers, in 1991, and he looked impressed, and said he had had his palladium electrodes analyzed, and that the set that had given consistent results had 0.25% Beryllium.
     
  8. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    So here is the chemistry where Beryllium makes a difference in what happens to an electrode of Pd. Lots of electricity, a corrosive solvent LiOD. electrodes were cracking, crumbling, corroding. This weakened the effort to load D into the electrode. No excess energy is seen until loading is achieved to about 0.9/1 wt/wt. So the presence of hardening agent, which also conferred corrosion resistance, made a difference. Be at 0.25%.

    Be at 0.1-0.25% is specified in many alloys where hardening or corrosion resistance is important. Very old science in that.

    Researchers are turning to other material designs which increase surface area because the reaction does happen near the surfaces.
     
  9. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
  10. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    In my little run out on Google today, I'm impressed. Things are changing. It is a lot different than oh five years ago the last time I looked at it.

    All the projects that were going on then are dead as doornails. metal-hosted fusion is out, all the hype is on free-standing energized contact designs..... plasma reactors.... not so different from the hydrogen fusion reactors really, but conceived to operate at lower temps, with forced contact other than just heat.

    But they all take pretty high energy inputs to start with, and so far only report about 1% gains in energy output. And they are optimistically talking about twenty years out for real success.....

    I guess I'll concentrate on designing a reactor that will produce gold...…..
     
  11. Gameface

    Gameface All-Jazzfanz First Team! Contributor 2018 Award Winner

    24,270
    6,581
    428
    May 25, 2010
    So now babe sort of low key is hinting that he kind of worked on an actual working cold fusion energy source.

    @babe was this before or after having tea with the queen of England? Before or after working on the inside of the Rockefeller empire? Before or after your ground breaking research on the harmful effects of Marijuana? Before or after your insider observations with the BLM (no, not Black Lives Matter, the Bureau of Land Management)?

    Really, can you just give us a timeline to track your life that is clearly more amazing than Forrest Gump's fictional life?
     
    Wes Mantooth likes this.
  12. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010

    ha ha.

    tell me again about your gun.....the really good one.... that you later said was in pieces. Didn't you know how to break it down.... and put it back together???
     
  13. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    So I spent some time today looking for actual published or reported online palladium alloys used in cold fusion/LENR experiments.

    I don't know if anybody listens to me, you know. I used to do metallurgical analysis of alloys as a regular job, for a few years, back in 1991 or so. Airplane alloys, Beryllium alloys.... alumimum and magnesium alloys..... auto parts.... whatever. Be was often a specified required spec..... .05% to a typical .25% max.... I understood that it is a hardening agent and that it confers corrosion resistance. Higher Be/Al alloys or Be/Cu alloys are very expensive items used in space craft or in very high spec switches where long switch life is paramount.... they coat the surface with the very hard alloy of Be/Cu.

    I didn't find any reported use of Be in Pd electrodes for cold fusion experiments. But the Naval Research lab did run some tests using a Pd/B alloy where the B content was 0.25%, 0.50% abd 0.75%. That was the researcher I spoke to when he came to the University of Utah and spoke at a seminar in the Chemistry Dept.

    Another small atom. They did spectrographs of the crystal structure and found a changed crystal structure associated with the B atoms proportional to the B content. ought to work much like Be.
     
  14. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    And don't you know? I am a cousin of the Queen, and of Maurice Strong.

    When I did my post-graduate thesis on genetics, I did research on the Mad Hatter gene.... well, not exactly the Mad Hatter gene, but the Brit Royal Insanity gene which has little to do with tailors licking mercerized thread..... I used it to explain family politics within my own damn family.....right along with the run-up to the American Revolution.

    Lewis Carrol clearly knew the Queen's true colors.

    I offer myself as a classic example of the dementia that afflicts the Brit Royals even today, which actually explains all the insanity in the UN and the globalist set of elites, and comprises the strongest reasons you should not be "progressives" dedicated to this sick political movement.

    Really, seriously, would you truly dedicate your life to the grand cause of making me the grand Whoba of planet earth? That is, roughly, what the whole globalist movement is all about, only not to make myself the Whoba but my cousin, the Queen. If it were me you were working for, I'd pay you better.

    Sorry I can't give you a precise timeline of my imaginary journeys through life. Imagination is, however, a better time machine than Dr. Who has.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  15. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

    10,610
    857
    203
    Dec 7, 2010
    At any rate, there was a great confab at MIT this spring, with a lot of run-up.... and evident political jousting for leadership. By such measures, I have to withdraw my optimism that this science/technology corridor hasn't now been hijacked by Establishment hacks, so that it will surely go nowhere anytime soon.

    Also the Billion-dollar international ITER has apparently gone down in flames.....
     

Share This Page