Pac-12 TV Contract Expected To Be The Richest In College Sports

//r00t 4 Jazz

Well-Known Member
At least according to the reports I've been googl'ing

https://seattle.sbnation.com/washin...-expected-to-be-the-richest-in-college-sports

By Brian Floyd - Editor
The Pac-12 is expected to announce a $3 billion television deal on Wednesday. If the reports are true, it will be the richest TV deal in all of college football.

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May 3, 2011 - On Wednesday, Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott will announce the conference's newest television deal, and it's expected to be the richest in all of college sports. The Pac-12, formerly the Pac-10, has lagged behind the rest of the college landscape with a paltry television deal on-par with smaller, non-BCS conferences. But now, thanks to the changing climate in the television market, Scott has struck gold, and the conference is poised to go from worst to first with a cutting-edge deal that includes more exposure and a significant bump in revenue.
Scott has been negotiating the deal through the early part of 2011, roping in Comcast, ESPN and FOX to create what amounted to a bidding war. Television rights for live sports have become a hot commodity, creating a perfect storm for the Pac-12 as Scott tried to deliver on his promise of riches. And he did, with reports indicating the deal will be worth billions, putting the Pac-12 on the level of the SEC and Big Ten in terms of revenue.
Here are a few of the details.
The deal will actually be worth about $3 billion total over 12 years, or about $250 million a year and nearly $21 million per school.
The conference has retained all network rights and plans to start its own network with a digital media platform akin to ESPN3. More than 850 events will be broadcast between the two.
The latter point is important and will allow the Pac-12 to showcase its non-revenue sports in addition to ensuring every football and basketball game is televised. By adding a digital media platform, the Pac-12 is boosting its exposure significantly while embracing the latest innovations in broadcast technology.
Pac-12 schools are celebrating the deal and championing Scott for his efforts to move the conference forward in just his first year on the job. From expansion to a ground-breaking deal, Scott has done well, and all 12 member institutions will be reaping the benefits very soon.
AND

https://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/football/ncaa/05/03/pac-10-tv.ap/

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- The Pac-12 agreed to a 12-year television contract with Fox and ESPN on Tuesday worth about $3 billion, allowing the conference to quadruple its media rights fees and start its own network.
The contract, which will begin with the 2012-13 season, will be worth about $250 million per year, guaranteeing each of the 12 schools in the conference about $21 million, a person familiar with the deal told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the contract has not been announced.
The contract is expected to be formally announced at a news conference in Phoenix on Wednesday.
The Pac-12 made less than $60 million in media rights this past season but became the latest conference to take advantage of the escalating market for college sports on television.
The ACC recently signed a deal for $155 million a year and the Big 12 reached a deal with Fox that made its total annual package worth about $130 million. The Pac-10, which will be renamed the Pac-12 in July with the additions of Utah and Colorado, topped those deals, as well as the $205 million the SEC gets and the $220 million paid to the Big Ten.
Rights to some football and men's basketball games were not sold to Fox and ESPN, preserving some premium property the conference can use for a Pac-12 network to go along with Olympic and other non-revenue sports, a person close to the deal said.
Unlike the Big Ten Network, which Fox has a 49 percent ownership share in, the Pac-12 will own its entire network. That could add difficulties in terms of getting wide distributions on cable and satellite systems but allows the conference to have complete control of its content and keep all the profits if the network is as successful as the Big Ten.
The conference will also launch a digital network to show games online that aren't on ESPN or Fox.
The deal with Fox and ESPN was first reported by Sports Business Daily, while The New York Times first reported details about the network.
This deal accomplishes all three goals Commissioner Larry Scott set out heading into negotiations: increasing revenue, getting more exposure and starting a Pac-12 network to provide an outlet to broadcast non-revenue sports and to help brand the conference.
Under this deal, Fox and ESPN will split the rights to college football games. ESPN will air its games on cable as well as ABC and Fox will show its games on its broadcast network, basic cable network FX and on the Fox Sports Net regional networks.
Men's basketball games will be split mostly between ESPN and Fox Sports Net, with ESPN also getting rights to some Olympic sports that will likely be aired on ESPNU.
The two entities will alternate showing the Pac-12 football championship game and the men's basketball tournament. Fox, which will air the inaugural football title game this season, will have the first football championship under this contract in 2012, with ESPN getting the men's basketball tournament later that season, a person familiar with the deal said.
Finalizing a media rights deal is the latest step in the transformation of the conference under Scott, who took over from Tom Hansen in July 2009.
Scott spearheaded last year's expansion effort and then got the schools to agree to an equal revenue sharing plan and aggregate all of their media rights at the conference level.
That set the stage for the television negotiations, which began in earnest April 1. While Comcast/NBC was an aggressive bidder and Turner Sports also was interested, incumbents Fox and ESPN won out.
This deal means full revenue sharing will kick in as soon as this contract begins. As part of an agreement to give up their historically larger share of television revenues, Southern California and UCLA were each to receive a $2 million premium any year that the media rights did not reach $170 million.
 

7StraightIsGreat

Well-Known Member
Let's be honest: Did Utah back-door their way into the Pac 12? Absolutely. Were they Larry Scott's first, second, or third choice? Certainly not. Were they simply invited because they were the most compatable choice to bring in with Colorado? Probably.

But with all that being said, they are where they are and that just happens to be in the conference with what is now the richest TV deal in all of college sports. Utah is leaving the worst conference commish (Craig Thompson) and going to the best ran conference in the nation. The money and exposure that is going to be pumped into Utah are going to transform this program into something bigger than even the most optimistic Ute fan could have ever fathomed.

It is indeed a good day to be a Ute.
 

Chad Feldheimer

Well-Known Member
Let's be honest: Did Utah back-door their way into the Pac 12? Absolutely. Were they Larry Scott's first, second, or third choice? Certainly not. Were they simply invited because they were the most compatable choice to bring in with Colorado? Probably.

But with all that being said, they are where they are and that just happens to be in the conference with what is now the richest TV deal in all of college sports. Utah is leaving the worst conference commish (Craig Thompson) and going to the best ran conference in the nation. The money and exposure that is going to be pumped into Utah are going to transform this program into something bigger than even the most optimistic Ute fan could have ever fathomed.

It is indeed a good day to be a Ute.
Texas and Nebraska were never going to the Pac12. Does it really matter if the Utes weren't the first choice? Not really. I am happy to see the Utes in a decent conference now. Adios Wyoming, Colorado St and the other bottom feeders. Just hope the Utes can compete year in and year out.
 

7StraightIsGreat

Well-Known Member
Texas and Nebraska were never going to the Pac12. Does it really matter if the Utes weren't the first choice? Not really. I am happy to see the Utes in a decent conference now. Adios Wyoming, Colorado St and the other bottom feeders. Just hope the Utes can compete year in and year out.
My thoughts exactly. Utah doesn't have to apologize to anybody for taking the Pac12 invite. In regards to the likes of Wyoming, there's some people out there who are strarting to think that bigger conferences with mega TV deals are going to be the eventual death penalty for the smaller programs. A few years ago I would have called nonsense on it, but now I'm not so sure. As these conferences compete for larger and larger TV deals, who's going to give money to the New Mexico's of the world just so people can watch Lobo football?
 

Jazz Spazz

Inconceivable
Staff member
Serious question here, not trolling.
When do the Utes start getting any decent money from the Pac 12... don't they start the first few years getting almost nothing?

I thought I remembered something like that, but correct me if I'm wrong.
 

Chad Feldheimer

Well-Known Member
Serious question here, not trolling.
When do the Utes start getting any decent money from the Pac 12... don't they start the first few years getting almost nothing?

I thought I remembered something like that, but correct me if I'm wrong.
"Utes' annual television revenue will grow from $1.2 million per year to estimates as high as $18-20 million.

The latter, however, will come in stages — reaching 100 percent after growing from a 50 percent share in 2012-13 and a 75 percent portion the following year."


https://www.deseretnews.com/article/700129672/Utah-Utes-sports-move-to-Pac-12-is-under-way.html

This is from April 23 so the money maybe a bit off. But I think the share percentage is correct.
 

Jazz Spazz

Inconceivable
Staff member
That's awesome, even with the 50% to 75% to 100% bump it's phenomenal.

These deals are like playing Risk... the next person to turn in the cards always gets a better deal than the last one.

Thanks for the info Chad
 

7StraightIsGreat

Well-Known Member
JazzSpazz wrote:
These deals are like playing Risk... the next person to turn in the cards always gets a better deal than the last one.
Definitely true. The SEC, ACC, and Big12 will all look to trump those Pac12 numbers the first chance they get, and they probably will. It's definitely trending towards conferences getting bigger and TV paydays for these mega conferences getting downright insane.
 

bigb

Free at last!!!
Contributor
BYU>Utah>Your Opinion


Not your best effort.

In regards to Utah's portion: don't they get 0% the first year before jumping to 50%, then 75%, then 100%? Is that what you said before and I'm just too tired to understand what you wrote?
 

Duck Rodgers

Well-Known Member
Does this mean Disney goes bankrupt? Short Disney stock?

I think whomever posted above that he just hopes they can compete is correct. That's been my stance all along with BYU and Utah advancing forward. It's great to have more money, it's great to play better teams, it's great to be off the mtn. channel, it's great to road trip to better locations, but ultimately it won't seem much different to the average fan if they aren't winning. But yes, 21 million/yr is dreamy to any athletic department and Utah deserves props for being able to get in that position.
 
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gregbroncs

Well-Known Member
Not your best effort.

In regards to Utah's portion: don't they get 0% the first year before jumping to 50%, then 75%, then 100%? Is that what you said before and I'm just too tired to understand what you wrote?
Funny thing is they get 0% but get an even cut of the championship money. Which is more than all of the money they would have recieved from the MWC TV deal. So even the 1st year with a 0% cut of money they came out with more money than they would have. After that 1st season their money is almost what they made for the entire time they were with the MWC.
 

7StraightIsGreat

Well-Known Member
Funny thing is they get 0% but get an even cut of the championship money. Which is more than all of the money they would have recieved from the MWC TV deal. So even the 1st year with a 0% cut of money they came out with more money than they would have. After that 1st season their money is almost what they made for the entire time they were with the MWC.
Man, the MWC deal was terrible. Chris Hill and Tom Holmoe have to be downright giddy that all of that trash is in their rear view mirror.
 
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