2020 Presidential election

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by gandalfe, Dec 31, 2018.

  1. infection

    infection Well-Known Member Staff Member 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    You're wanting me to answer that question?
     
  2. leftyjace

    leftyjace Well-Known Member

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    Do you recall WHEN this vote took place?
    Was it in November?
    Was it earlier in the year?
    That would help pin down what type of election it was.
     
  3. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    Have you been following the conversation at all?

    General elections are open votes to everybody. Primaries are not. Acting as if you voting for Romney is proof that the primary was an open vote, when you don't know if it was the general or primary is ridiculous.
     
  4. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    Then by that definition, neither party is inclusive.

    Thank you, and have a good day.
     
  5. The Thriller

    The Thriller Well-Known Member

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    I think there are a few arguments for restricting voting to party members. The strongest argument is most likely that permitting independents to vote could potentially sabotage the general election by nominating an unelectable candidate in the primary. A valid concern. Looking back at 2016, I might've voted for Trump in the primary hoping to sabotage the GOP for the general. Jeb Bush scared me far more than huckster Trump. However, seeing how polarized the two parties are and how extreme the right has become, I'm open to trying open primaries. I think opening up the primaries could help dilute some of the extremists in parties and help both parties nominate more moderate candidates.

    I don't necessarily have a strong opinion on this issue. I'm just saying that I'd be open to opening up primaries to more (moderate) voters instead of die hards. I've been to Utah caucus nights. I've never been so scared for my life. The caucus night when I lived in Orem where incumbent Bob Bennett was ousted and Tim Bridgewater and Mike Lee were nominated was scary as hell. It was like being at a Trump rally before Trump was even a political figure. Lots of angry craziness. So anything to drown out the crazy John Birch Society Eagle Forum nutjobs in the caucuses is a good thing in my book.
     
  6. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    Of course. I think it's a good question and you are smart guy that could maybe explain it to me.

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  7. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I was very specific in my example of being able to vote for Bernie but not a republican presidential candidate. That's what I don't like and doesn't make sense to me.

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  8. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    But I can vote for the Democratic presidential candidate. So they aren't the same. At least in my state.

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  9. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I honestly don't. I wish I did.

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  10. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I was just going to post this.

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  11. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't have huge issues with opening up the primaries, I'm just saying that I can see a lot of reasons why they wouldn't. It's not a black and white issue.

    My only issue here is saying that a party is not inclusive bc of closed primaries is being close minded of all the valid reasons for doing it that way.
     
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  12. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    Funny how trying to give equal treatment becomes "deference" to some people. Using loaded language doesn't help your look much.
     
  13. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    At best, that a very weak version of egalitarianism; one designed to promote exclusion by individuals.
     
  14. Safetydan

    Safetydan Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. Poor choice of words. I'll adjust it to this: The GOP is not your party if you're looking for a party that will fight for the rights of minorities.
     
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  15. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    Or women.
    If you are unborn baby they will fight for you though... Right up until you are born. Then you are on your own.

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  16. The Thriller

    The Thriller Well-Known Member

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    I agree
     
  17. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    Will wonders never ceases?
     
  18. JazzGal

    JazzGal Well-Known Member Contributor

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    In Utah, if you are registered Republican, you can choose to vote in the Republican or the Democrat primary election. I doubt few Republicans pick the Democrat option because it is rarely close enough to matter.

    If you are a registered Democrat, you can only vote in the Democrat primary election.

    If you are registered Unaffiliated, you can vote in the Democrat primary election, or if there are nonpartisan options you can choose a ballot with only those options. I vote by mail, and if there are nonpartisan options, I receive a letter telling me that I need to choose by mail or online which ballot I prefer.

    All voters can vote in the general election. If you are registered Unaffiliated and voted for Mitt Romney for Senate, that had to be the general election. You wouldn't have had the option otherwise.

    I don't like the closed Republican primaries, but I understand their reasoning, although since they have such a lock on the state it wouldn't matter anyway. If I didn't feel so strongly about being independent, I would change to Republican just to vote in the governor's race primary, but I just can't make myself align for even a day with either party.
     
  19. JazzGal

    JazzGal Well-Known Member Contributor

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    No matter who wins the presidential election, lots of stupid things are going to be said in the following four years. Ugh!
     
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  20. The Thriller

    The Thriller Well-Known Member

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    I don’t think it would make much of a difference in utah either. Perhaps it might force them to nominate a more moderate candidate? I mean would a guy like mike Lee be a Fix if moderate independents could vote in the republican primary? We all know the Republican candidate will win in the general election in utah. The question is, which Republican candidate? The moderate one or the crazy extremist one that seems to be winning the caucus primary at an ever increasing pace? And if not winning the nomination, at least winning the ideological battle as the moderate must now take ever increasingly extremist positions
     

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