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Buffalo Shooting




fishonjazz

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Yeah. The right never makes shooters out to be superstars…


View: https://twitter.com/RonFilipkowski/status/1533459547041370117?s=20&t=Mfq0ecdylvGCEy8AcqjGBA


This seems ominous from tonight’s episode of White Supremacy Power Hour:

View: https://twitter.com/acyn/status/1533974284829224960?s=21&t=nntAnD32tD7Clj_t_Obz_w

Does he understand that fox news and Tucker Carlson are literally media. Literally the biggest media there is in this country. Idiot

Also they say kyle is what you want in a man cause he #1 thing a man should do is protect his family but when did kyle protect his family? Idiots
 
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fishonjazz

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During the 1994-2004 ban:

In the years after the assault weapons ban went into effect, the number of deaths from mass shootings fell, and the increase in the annual number of incidents slowed down. Even including 1999’s Columbine High School massacre – the deadliest mass shooting during the period of the ban – the 1994 to 2004 period saw lower average annual rates of both mass shootings and deaths resulting from such incidents than before the ban’s inception.

From 2004 onward:

The data shows an almost immediate – and steep – rise in mass shooting deaths in the years after the assault weapons ban expired in 2004.

Breaking the data into absolute numbers, between 2005 and 2017 – the last year of our analysis – the average number of yearly deaths attributed to mass shootings was 25, compared with 5.3 during the 10-year tenure of the ban and 7.2 in the years leading up to the prohibition on assault weapons.

We calculated that the risk of a person in the U.S. dying in a mass shooting was 70% lower during the period in which the assault weapons ban was active. The proportion of overall gun homicides resulting from mass shootings was also down, with nine fewer mass-shooting-related fatalities per 10,000 shooting deaths.

Taking population trends into account, a model we created based on this data suggests that had the federal assault weapons ban been in place throughout the whole period of our study – that is, from 1981 through 2017 – it may have prevented 314 of the 448 mass shooting deaths that occurred during the years in which there was no ban.

And this almost certainly underestimates the total number of lives that could be saved. For our study, we chose only to include mass shooting incidents that were reported and agreed upon by all three of our selected data sources: the Los Angeles Times, Stanford University, and Mother Jones magazine.
Furthermore, for uniformity, we also chose to use the strict federal definition of an assault weapon – which may not include the entire spectrum of what many people may now consider to be assault weapons.

So there is one thing that could be done to help save lives. And we did it before. And it worked.
 


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