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As a Florida elementary school tries to contain a growing measles outbreak, the state’s top health official is giving advice that runs counter to science and may leave unvaccinated children at risk of contracting one of the most contagious pathogens on Earth, clinicians and public health experts said.

Instead of following what he acknowledged was the “normal” recommendation that parents keep unvaccinated children home for up to 21 days - the incubation period for measles - Ladapo said the state health department “is deferring to parents or guardians to make decisions about school attendance.”

The controversial move by Ladapo follows a pattern of bucking public health norms, particularly when it comes to vaccines.

Ben Hoffman, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, said Florida’s guidance flies in the face of long-standing and widely accepted public health guidance for measles, which can result in severe complications, including death.

“It runs counter to everything I have ever heard and everything that I have read,” Hoffman said. “It runs counter to our policy. It runs counter to what the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] would recommend.”

Measles outbreaks have been on the rise in recent years. So far in 2024, at least 26 cases in at least 12 states have been reported to the CDC, about double the number at this point last year. In addition to the six cases confirmed in the Florida school, cases have been reported in Arizona, California, Georgia, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York City, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.
Experts say the outbreaks are linked to the growing number of parents seeking exemptions from childhood vaccinations in recent years following political backlash to coronavirus pandemic mandates and rampant misinformation about the safety of vaccines.

“The reason why there is a measles outbreak in Florida schools is because too many parents have not had their children protected by the safe and effective measles vaccine,” said John P. Moore, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Weill Cornell Medical College. “And why is that? It’s because anti-vaccine sentiment in Florida comes from the top of the public health food-chain: Joseph Ladapo.”

Paul Offit, a pediatric infectious diseases expert at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, said Ladapo’s failure to urge vaccination endangers children.

“Is he trying to prove that measles isn’t a contagious disease when the data are clear that it is the most contagious vaccine-preventable disease, far more contagious than influenza or covid?” Offit wrote in an email.

Poor kids stuck with stupid parents.
 
Poor kids stuck with stupid parents.
Did you read anywhere in that story that the sick kids were unvaccinated? No. You did not. Your linked story is propaganda.

There are 1,067 kids in that school. The MMR vaccine, if boosted with a second dose, is 97% effective meaning that if every kid in that school was double vaccinated and exposed, you'd expect to see 32 of the fully vaccinated kids come down with measles. Presenting proof of MMR vaccination is mandatory for attending Florida public school just like it is in the rest of the country.

Outbreaks which have happened, as stated in your article, in Arizona, California, Georgia, Florida, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York City, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia, but somehow it is only Florida that is bad. If you want to be angry, be mad at scientists for making a vaccine that is only 97% effective.
 
Did you read anywhere in that story that the sick kids were unvaccinated?

Yes.
In a measles outbreak in Ohio that began in late 2022, most of the 85 children infected were old enough to get the shots, but their parents chose not to do so. (Their parents chose not to is the indicator that they weren't vaccinated)

including the 2017 outbreak in Minnesota that affected 75 people, most of them unvaccinated (the word "unvaccinated" is the indicator here), and most of them children.

I'm sure the rise in the diseases that the vaccine were made for has nothing to do with the decrease in vaccinations though lol.

You are being silly again

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The point of the article is that cases of these diseases is going up and vaccinations are going down. If you use logic and reason then parents choosing to not get their children vaccinated results in more children contracting these diseases.


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There are 1,067 kids in that school. The MMR vaccine, if boosted with a second dose, is 97% effective meaning that if every kid in that school was double vaccinated and exposed, you'd expect to see 32 of the fully vaccinated kids come down with measles.
It means ~32 people would be vulnerable to measles. If vaccination were universal, I would expect to see 0 kids contract measles.

Presenting proof of MMR vaccination is mandatory for attending Florida public school just like it is in the rest of the country.
True, but anti-vax parents will shop around for an anti-vax physician that will grant permanent medical exemptions.
 
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