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Election Fraud


babe

Well-Known Member
Did you respond to the wrong post?
I was mocking you, for your exaggerated claims about me.

Maybe I should smile and just say good job.

It is the sad reality that every European, or basically doomed infidel on planet earth, or every incurable and hopelessly deformed racist by birth, is descended, with high statistical probability and in multiple lines, from Charlemagne. We are the mutants who wandered off the stable African Eden and got lost in the cold northern latitudes and evolved with a positive Darwinian predilection for pale skin.

Corollaries to this thesis relate me, and you, to every deplorable character in the history of Europe. It was fashionable for centuries for huddling masses of marginal humanity outside the palaces to claim royal heritage, and some of the claims were even false, but hopeful for the talebearers and the befuddled stinking peasants. A likely tolerable lass could at least imagine one night inside a castle, and maybe even a bath.

In this wide world, bro, fiction seldom rises to the level of reality, no matter how hard we try to accentuate the tales with truth.
 


Red

Well-Known Member
We are the mutants who wandered off the stable African Eden and got lost in the cold northern latitudes and evolved with a positive Darwinian predilection for pale skin.

Many scientists have believed that lighter skin gradually arose in Europeans starting around 40,000 years ago, soon after people left tropical Africa for Europe's higher latitudes. The hunter-gatherer's dark skin pushes this date forward to only 7,000 years ago, suggesting that at least some humans lived considerably longer than thought in Europe before losing the dark pigmentation that evolved under Africa's sun.

"It was assumed that the lighter skin was something needed in high latitudes, to synthesize vitamin D in places where UV light is lower than in the tropics," Lalueza-Fox told LiveScience.

Scientists had assumed this was true because people need vitamin D for healthy bones, and can synthesize it in the skin with energy from the sun's UV rays, but darker skin, like that of the hunter-gatherer man, prevents UV-ray absorption.

But the new discovery shows that latitude alone didn't drive the evolution of Europeans' light skin. If it had, light skin would have become widespread in Europeans millennia earlier, Lalueza-Fox said.
 


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