Jon Stewart on white privilege (cc: unnamed posters... etc.)

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by HighlandHomie, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. jimmy eat jazz

    jimmy eat jazz Well-Known Member

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    Here's your relevant quote: "The term white privilege caries an implication that one groups rights are exercised at the expense of the other. It is not a zero sum game. We can build a better society for black America without taking anything from white America."

    I disagree, for the reasons stated above.

    Now, if you'd like to make this about specifically about police shootings, then I agree with what you write above.
     
  2. jimmy eat jazz

    jimmy eat jazz Well-Known Member

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    In fairness, is there anyone who actually does this? (Bracing myself for the inevitable Al Sharpton reference.)
     
  3. Stoked

    Stoked Well-Known Member Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    lol at the Al Sharpton jab.

    It is brought up in every single debate that has to deal with race. It is used as an excuse for the anger (justifiable) and any illegal actions that result from it (unjustifiable imo). Now granted not everyone uses that as a crutch but someone always does.
     
  4. jimmy eat jazz

    jimmy eat jazz Well-Known Member

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    Well, I think you've overstated things a bit, but fair enough.

    I'm a masochist, so I sometimes read the comments to national news items, including Michael Brown. The degree of racism encountered there is shocking, if not surprising. I've learned that racists invariably refer at some point to Al Sharpton. It's like a variation of Godwin's Law, but instead of someone inevitably comparing someone to Hitler or Nazi's, racists inevitably invoke Al Sharpton in an attempt to discredit anyone who tries to suggest that racial discrimination remains a salient social and economic issue.
     
  5. ♪alt13

    ♪alt13 Well-Known Member

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    No I want you to show that it is a zero sum game. Break the problem down and prove it. I hold that if we can protect the rights of minorities, increase their standard of living, allow them the same opportunities as whites that whites will themselves benefit from this. What you offered above was a vague idea of power. A specific example of power is wealth. If black people have more wealth they will spend that wealth and grow the economy helping white people. If black people buy more new cars that doesn't mean that there will be less cars available for white people. It means that the manufacturer will build more cars.

    Your turn again.
     
  6. Stoked

    Stoked Well-Known Member Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    Absolutely it is. The racism on those comments is far from being only one sided, it flows every which way and is disgusting. Some of it is truly how that person feels and some of it is for shock value. Either way it is pathetic.

    As for Sharpton. I dislike him because I truly do not think he cares about the peopel involved in all these issues/cases. IMO, he is charlatan in that this is all about him and not anyone else. He is there to keep his name in the headlines so he can continue to be popular which leads to getting paid.

    He is like the Kim Kardashian/Paris Hilton/Nicole Richie...of the political/racial world. Brings nothing to the table other than his name.
     
  7. jimmy eat jazz

    jimmy eat jazz Well-Known Member

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    Holy hell, I've better things to do today (such as work) than engage in a tête-à-tête with you on this topic. I don't disagree with anything you write above--my GENERAL point (and no I don't care to take more time to give specific examples, so if you don't like it, tough *******) is that, as a GENERAL rule, groups who possess power tend not to relinquish it voluntarily . The US has a existing power structure that is largely male and largely white, which allows those in power (again, largely male and largely white) to allocate economic resources to its allies (again, largely male and largely white). Increasing the political, social and economic power of blacks, women or other minority (traditionally marginalized) groups inherently diminishes the power of the entrenched power structure where it comes to allocating a set of fixed (in the short to medium term) economic resources, and will thus be opposed by the members of this entrenched power structure. I believe my argument rests on valid grounds, but if you disagree, that's perfectly oky doky with me.

    Edited to Add: If it were so obvious that allowing traditionally marginalized group an equal seat at the table along with traditionally powerful groups is a win-win (and in the rational self-interest of powerful groups), one must account for why this hasn't happened yet, and why it is only happening gradually and often in fits and starts. There are probably many contributing factors to this, but a reasonable hypothesis is that one factor is that powerful groups tend not to willingly relinquish power, which power allows them to allocate scarce economic and political resources to their allies, so that they and their allies can continue to capture, among other things, economic rents. Your theory can't account for the pervasive existence of anomalies, while I'm trying to propose one hypothesis as to why such anomalies might exist.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2014
  8. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    You trying to imply he is po. ****ing racists *******.
     
  9. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. A conflict that many resolve through system justification and similar notions.

    I feel that any alternative term you pick will be seen as a similarly political wedge.
     
  10. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    I stand corrected. My apologies.
     
    Stoked likes this.
  11. jimmy eat jazz

    jimmy eat jazz Well-Known Member

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    It is certainly easy to be cynical about Sharpton's motives, as I suppose we should be about anyone who becomes wealthy through social agitation. I was in graduate school during the Tawana Brawley incident where Sharpton made his name, and that image of him is very hard to shake, even today. That said, he's become a convenient boogie man for racists to invoke so as to tar any attempt to have a real discussion on race and the racial inequities that continue to plague US society, even today.
     
  12. franklin

    franklin Well-Known Member

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    This cynical view of the motivations of white America sounds like it came from the Black Panthers. But you're probably correct: none of us want lower crime and incarceration rates, or the perceived welfare problems to go away. When we say we want to fix that, we really mean we want to keep blacks under our collective current power structure boot.
     
  13. ♪alt13

    ♪alt13 Well-Known Member

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    K, then don't. I didn't read beyond this. If you don't have time to engage with me then that is ok.

    Maybe. I'll pick discrimination towards blacks. I think at least 95% of us can agree that discrimination towards blacks exists and is a srs problem that we should address. If that term is a wedge then we can modify it. Once we drop the rhetoric we can start talking about solutions.


    I'll start a new thread with a poll.
     
  14. Gameface

    Gameface All-Jazzfanz First Team! Contributor 2018 Award Winner

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    I've got an idea for you. Go read my posts in the Ferguson thread. Hint, the one that's tl;dr, read that one.
     
  15. PearlWatson

    PearlWatson Well-Known Member

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    Why is it that the black community only riots when the "community member" is a criminal? Can't they find an innocent individual to destroy their neighborhood for?
     
  16. HighlandHomie

    HighlandHomie Well-Known Member

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    Why is community member in quotes? Putting aside your asinine, racist generalization and assertions - Brown was not a criminal, you morbid piece of ****. Here's to you contracting a terminal disease in the near future.
     
  17. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I think admittedly robbing a store, whether a weapon was involved or not, constitutes a criminal act.
     
  18. HighlandHomie

    HighlandHomie Well-Known Member

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    I don't categorize one-time offenders as criminals. Yes, a criminal act. But so is a speeding ticket, DUI, etc.
     
  19. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Did you thoroughly review his record? I never saw anything about his record other than the robbery, but that does not by any stretch mean he had no record.
     
  20. PearlWatson

    PearlWatson Well-Known Member

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    because that was your euphemism...I would never call a white robber a "community member"...violating the community in such a violent manner would cause me to distance myself from them not embrace them.
     

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