POLL: How has COVID affected your job?

How have the COVID-19 shutdowns and subsequent impact on the economy affected your job personally?

  • I already worked from home, no effect

    Votes: 5 20.8%
  • I already worked outside of the home, no effect

    Votes: 8 33.3%
  • I worked outside of the home before, but now I work from home

    Votes: 8 33.3%
  • I worked from home before, but now I work in a job at an office/work site

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I lost my job, and still have not been able to get a new position

    Votes: 1 4.2%
  • I lost my job, but have since found a new position

    Votes: 2 8.3%

  • Total voters
    24

Ron Mexico

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Probably true. Also true that you may conversely get less people interested in your product/service.
Possibly, although better paid and treated employees might work harder and enjoy their job more. So you might get more people interested in your product/survive.
 

Joe Bagadonuts

Well-Known Member
Possibly, although better paid and treated employees might work harder and enjoy their job more. So you might get more people interested in your product/survive.
I think he works in warehousing. Do you think you would be more likely to purchase a product because it was warehoused exceptionally well? It is definitely a problem that the government is paying people more not to work than employers are paying them to work. Paying people not to work is ultimately bad for everybody.
 

Ron Mexico

Well-Known Member
Contributor
I think he works in warehousing. Do you think you would be more likely to purchase a product because it was warehoused exceptionally well? It is definitely a problem that the government is paying people more not to work than employers are paying them to work. Paying people not to work is ultimately bad for everybody.
No, I think harder working happy employees will produce more. Meaning they can lower prices.
 

b_line

Well-Known Member
I work outside of the home in tourism, I run a whitewater rafting business in Jackson Hole. We have never had a busier July than this year. People are locking to yellowstone and grand teton. Its kind of wild. The spring was very different for me. I spent most of my time modeling financial situations for my company to try and make it through the pandemic. I did not think we would be able to operate at all, but it turns out we are. Basically, we have spent almost nothing, and been very busy, so profit margin will be very high.
 

LogGrad98

Well-Known Member
Contributor
That's the only standard is that it's more than minimum wage? I'm pretty sure if you increase the wage you'll get more people interested in the job.
Yep, of course. I will tell the CEO we need to pay warehouse material handlers 100k per year. That'll work!


Frankly I'd love to pay everyone 100k. But at some point you have to be realistic and do what you can in your sphere. So your suggestion is pretty short sighted given the current climate. But hey, tons of money for everyone, I'm fully on board!
 

Gameface

Black Lives Matter
Contributor
2018 Award Winner
If a person is offered employment and they refuse they are technically no longer eligible for unemployment benefits.

I don't know how that works logistically from an employer's point of view, if there is an actual mechanism for reporting a job offer that was declined.

Not sure it's even really in an employer's long term interest to report declined job offers, although I would think it would be as unemployment claims cost the previous employer money. You'd think in general employers would look out for each other by reporting declined job offers to thin the pool of people collecting unemployment and discourage abuse. Regardless, the rule is that if offered a job and you decline you are no longer eligible for unemployment.
 

Wes Mantooth

Well-Known Member
There was a point in my life where everything was going wrong, and I mean everything. If I listed it all you wouldn't believe me. At my lowest point a friend said, "Damn, something really good must be coming your way." I told him he was an idiot, and he told me that I would eventually see the light because "these sorts of things tend to even out." Man was he ever right. My life is now amazing in every way. On top of everything else, COVID which initially killed our business has now supercharged it. We have already set our all time record for a year (after being dead in the water for nearly four months), and we still have five months to go.

So keep your chin up because something really good is headed your way.
What kind of business?
 

Wes Mantooth

Well-Known Member
I work outside of the home in tourism, I run a whitewater rafting business in Jackson Hole. We have never had a busier July than this year. People are locking to yellowstone and grand teton. Its kind of wild. The spring was very different for me. I spent most of my time modeling financial situations for my company to try and make it through the pandemic. I did not think we would be able to operate at all, but it turns out we are. Basically, we have spent almost nothing, and been very busy, so profit margin will be very high.
Awesome, dude! I was wondering about that.
 

Eminence

Well-Known Member
Yep, of course. I will tell the CEO we need to pay warehouse material handlers 100k per year. That'll work!


Frankly I'd love to pay everyone 100k. But at some point you have to be realistic and do what you can in your sphere. So your suggestion is pretty short sighted given the current climate. But hey, tons of money for everyone, I'm fully on board!
There's a bit of a gap between $15/hour and 100k. Probably not up to you, but I'm not sure why you should be surprised either, those are borderline unlivable wages in parts of California, and not exactly good money anywhere in the US, even here in the middle of nowhere midwest.
 

Ron Mexico

Well-Known Member
Contributor
The chance that an employer can use a pay increase to get enough extra productivity from warehouse employees to justify lowering their prices to consumers is exceedingly low.
Possibly, but you can hire better employees. That's been well documented.
 

Ron Mexico

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Yep, of course. I will tell the CEO we need to pay warehouse material handlers 100k per year. That'll work!


Frankly I'd love to pay everyone 100k. But at some point you have to be realistic and do what you can in your sphere. So your suggestion is pretty short sighted given the current climate. But hey, tons of money for everyone, I'm fully on board!
That's a big jump. Going from barely above minimum wage to 100k.

Other things are being discussed in a political way. I'm being sincere. If you can't hire people for what you are offering and you need employees then the best solution is to bump the wage up a little bit. You can possibly get better employees as a perk. Maybe a good hard working employee from another company will want that job.

It's not short sighted in this economy to pay a little more. It's short sighted to not get employees if you need them right now, even if they cost a little bit more.

But probably out of your control.
 

babe

Well-Known Member
Got it. Mixing pee with bleach will boost my sex life. @TroutBum I know that you are aware of this. What is your preferred ratio?
Oxidizing ammonia with bleach. hmmmm.....

you're stroking.......straws...... here.

I know the power of imagination is about 195% of any man's sex life, but really...... you'd do better to find a good thunderstorm to go out and dance in the rain with.

Getting struck by lightning is as good as sex with a bomb.

And besides, you know, there's a smell that comes with rain. It's as good as any perfume ladies have got, either in nature or by contrivance, and with lightning there's the definite smell of ozone, which will also do wonders on pee.
 

infection

Well-Known Member
Staff member
2018 Award Winner
2019 Award Winner
Possibly, but you can hire better employees. That's been well documented.
So there's a pay bump to compete against unemployment. Then there would be another pay bump to get people above that tier. There may be a line that can get crossed where you'd make significantly more working than being on unemployment, but for every small increase in pay, it is only a fraction of the proportion of effort difference between full time and unemployed. For instance, many (most?) people would take a 20% reduction in pay if it meant a 100% reduction in work. You could probably continue that quite a ways down. If I could make even 40% of my income by not working, the reduction in headache would be massive. And worth it. Obviously I'm speaking hypothetically, but when people are put in a situation where you get significantly diminished returns on your efforts, it should not surprise that it does impact behavior.
 
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