Coronavirus in China

infection

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That chart is missing some countries. Such as China that has tested more than the USA at over 90 million. Russia has tested 27+ million as well.
The chart is missing countries, and I was trying to find a more complete one but settled for that. With regard to who has tested the most, here's Johns Hopkins, updated for 7/29:

The U.S. has conducted more COVID-19 tests than any other country. However, there is no expert consensus on a recommended target for the raw number of tests or even the rate of tests per capita
 

infection

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I haven’t seen a single meme about testing less. I know it makes conservatives feel better to dehumanize critics of the president by accusing them of being persuaded by memes.
You're using meme in the specific sense of an image with a statement. I'm using meme in the broader sense of an idea repeated in simplicity and for the sake of humor, but represents and underlying cultural understanding. I won't address the idea that assuming someone is persuaded by memes dehumanizes them, but that's interesting (I'd argue that being persuaded by memes is a very human trait). The meme I'm referencing serves as a loophole for sidestepping the issue. For instance:

People: We aren't testing enough.
People: Our cases are rising!
Other people: We are testing a lot of people.
Trump: We are testing so much, we should reduce testing!
People: He suggests reducing testing!

We're side-stepping the issue of where our testing is at by using Trump as a distraction. That's why I'm attempting to refocus on the actual issue: the testing. A good example of that is taking place in this thread. You stated that Utah's testing has dipped. I gave you the graph of testing over time, showing no dip (unless you're counting the past 3 days that they've qualified as lags, which would be like saying "so and so only scored 2 points tonight" when it's the first quarter). I'm assuming you now understand what I was addressing, but we've been able to side-step the fact that this was wrong by discussing Trump and actually dropping the subject of discussion that brought Trump up.
 

Avery

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Confirmed cases have been trending down in Utah which is refreshing to see. Hoping we can put the days of near 1k behind us and get down to the low-hundreds as a starting point (obviously 0 cases would be the goal). Mandatory masks in most large businesses has helped; still some room to grow in applying this to gas stations and smaller establishments.

Still a lot of work to do, but moving in the right direction.
 

infection

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339 cases today.

Another thing I'd like to point out, if you look at the official tracking site for the state, they break down the graphs based on number of tests positive as well as number of people positive. This is more transparent than a lot of other states. This is important because the total positive tests that day account for retests. People have mentioned that people are tested frequently in the hospital (this is true, especially if these people are headed back to nursing homes whose criteria is a negative COVID test, and how those hospitalized will skew toward this kind of population). However, I have always pushed back on this idea because I do not believe testing of people inpatient on repeats is a large reason for positives, because so few people are hospitalized relative to those with positive tests (another good thing that you won't be hearing anywhere else). However, the larger component of retesting that would start to make a sizable impact in the daily report of positive tests is for employment: those people who can't return to work until they have a negative COVID test. Those would drastically outnumber hospital retests. So, what does this translate to? Not a ton, currently, but here are some numbers from last week:

7/19: 470 positive tests but only 418 new cases.
7/20: 690 positive tests but only 576 new cases.
7/21: 690 positive tests but only 613 new cases.
7/22: 754 positive tests but only 665 new cases.
7/23: 671 positive tests but only 614 new cases.
7/24: 671 positive tests but only 590 new cases.

So total for that 6-day span is 3,946 total positives, with 3,476 of those people being actual new cases. This is only about a 14% increase. So it's not that big. However, that proportion will continue to increase as testing increases, indentifying new cases that will require people to repeat tests for occupational purposes, and as they retest at higher frequencies.

But I don't know how they are vetting this, either, so if people are testing at different places, they may not have the ability to capture who has already tested positive, so 14% would likely be a minimum estimate, but by how much is unknown.
 

fishonjazz

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You're using meme in the specific sense of an image with a statement. I'm using meme in the broader sense of an idea repeated in simplicity and for the sake of humor, but represents and underlying cultural understanding. I won't address the idea that assuming someone is persuaded by memes dehumanizes them, but that's interesting (I'd argue that being persuaded by memes is a very human trait). The meme I'm referencing serves as a loophole for sidestepping the issue. For instance:

People: We aren't testing enough.
People: Our cases are rising!
Other people: We are testing a lot of people.
Trump: We are testing so much, we should reduce testing!
People: He suggests reducing testing!

We're side-stepping the issue of where our testing is at by using Trump as a distraction. That's why I'm attempting to refocus on the actual issue: the testing. A good example of that is taking place in this thread. You stated that Utah's testing has dipped. I gave you the graph of testing over time, showing no dip (unless you're counting the past 3 days that they've qualified as lags, which would be like saying "so and so only scored 2 points tonight" when it's the first quarter). I'm assuming you now understand what I was addressing, but we've been able to side-step the fact that this was wrong by discussing Trump and actually dropping the subject of discussion that brought Trump up.
The lesson, as always, is that everything would be better if there were no trump.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
 

infection

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The lesson, as always, is that everything would be better if there were no trump.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
Unfortunately "we just can't help ourselves in in our response to Trump -- it's his fault" fails to be a legitimate discussion point when someone who isn't Trump is engaging with someone substantively on the issues.
 

fishonjazz

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Unfortunately "we just can't help ourselves in in our response to Trump -- it's his fault" fails to be a legitimate discussion point when someone who isn't Trump is engaging with someone substantively on the issues.
I know right? It's totally not a legitimate discussion point, yet it exists and is used often.
Would be nice if that option didn't exist.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
 

Avery

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Correlation doesn't equal causation and what not, but outside of better use of masks, I don't feel that anything has necessarily changed as a root cause. I still see crowded parks, team activities, etc.

I am concerned that cramming students into crowded classrooms is going to go awry especially as children will fidget and teenagers are poor at mask use (anecdotal on my part). That probably won't show up until September.
 

infection

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Also wanted to note that over the weekend there was a KSL article that mentioned that if we were down, per the governor's goal, to 500 cases per day on the 7-day average by August 1, that it would be "the first time in months" that we've been under 500. This was patently false. I had made a comment to the article stating that it hadn't even technically been a month yet, at that point, that we've exceeded 500 per day on a 7-day average, and the nearest date that would qualify as the plural "months" we were at 165 cases per day. Eventually, they corrected this. They didn't, however, reference that a change had been made in the report (which is standard) and they deleted my comment from the comments section.
 

Avery

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Also wanted to note that over the weekend there was a KSL article that mentioned that if we were down, per the governor's goal, to 500 cases per day on the 7-day average by August 1, that it would be "the first time in months" that we've been under 500. This was patently false. I had made a comment to the article stating that it hadn't even technically been a month yet, at that point, that we've exceeded 500 per day on a 7-day average, and the nearest date that would qualify as the plural "months" we were at 165 cases per day. Eventually, they corrected this. They didn't, however, reference that a change had been made in the report (which is standard) and they deleted my comment from the comments section.
Your first mistake was using KSL comments. They can be as bad as Youtube and Facebook comments in so far as either the world is ending due to COVID, hide your chilrden or it's all a hoax propagated by the deep state to reduce the world population to 5 million.
 

infection

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Your first mistake was using KSL comments. They can be as bad as Youtube and Facebook comments in so far as either the world is ending due to COVID, hide your chilrden or it's all a hoax propagated by the deep state to reduce the world population to 5 million.
I don't typically read the comments. I had an account because I made comments once back about 5 years ago. I was going to contact the author but felt I'd just make the comment so at least other people could see it.

There's a bias toward "oh ****" and I have no idea where they ever got the idea that we'd been at over 500 for "months," because that's among one of the easiest things to check, but it must have sounded and felt good and was consistent with "oh ****" so they ran it.
 

infection

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The other thing with KSL is that you will get the headline each day of "x new cases, y deaths." Except on days where the death number isn't as "sexy." So when there are 0-2 deaths, you get "x new cases." They don't mention 0 deaths. Ever. Or 1 death. Or 2. Just watch.
 

Avery

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The other thing with KSL is that you will get the headline each day of "x new cases, y deaths." Except on days where the death number isn't as "sexy." So when there are 0-2 deaths, you get "x new cases." They don't mention 0 deaths. Ever. Or 1 death. Or 2. Just watch.
All media is guilty of sensationalism with headlines. My guess is people click more if they see people are dying (seeing where they are, age, hospitalized or not, etc).

As poor as it is, death sells for media. The more dire something is, the more they become a beneficiary.
 

infection

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All media is guilty of sensationalism with headlines. My guess is people click more if they see people are dying (seeing where they are, age, hospitalized or not, etc).

As poor as it is, death sells for media. The more dire something is, the more they become a beneficiary.
Of course. Yet many will not allow themselves to acknowledge the subtle variables that greatly influences how they're viewing and approaching this problem.
 

Avery

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Of course. Yet many will not allow themselves to acknowledge the subtle variables that greatly influences how they're viewing and approaching this problem.
Which is why you should never use one source of media for all your news intake. I try and read stories from many organizations to try and get a more centralized view. Yes, that means reading Fox News as well as CNN and also tossing in smaller online-only periodicals. It helps let you make your own informed opinions as often-times, the answer may lie somewhere in the middle.

Always a pleasure seeing how the same piece of news gets portrayed depending on who tells the story.
 

Ron Mexico

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The chart is missing countries, and I was trying to find a more complete one but settled for that. With regard to who has tested the most, here's Johns Hopkins, updated for 7/29:



That link gives me an error but that might be on my end. I am fairly confident China has done more tests. I was just in Beijing where they did mass testing of about half the city and witnessed it. They have done over 90 million tests. Also producing the vast majority of tests for the world, but that's another issue. Either way your statement or quote that USA has done more tests in July than any other country has overall is incorrect.

Edit: I don't know how USA is testing but China is doing mass testing by panels. Meaning they do 1 test for I think 5-10 people then if it's positive everyone tests individually. So it might be less tests but more people. But still that's not a correct number.
 
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Ron Mexico

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My brother in Idaho had his son get a fever and other symptoms. This prompted him to get his son and himself tested. The results are taking over a week to get back. His work told him it was a bad idea for him to get tested because he can't work now until he gets the results but should have skipped the test and kept working until he showed symptoms himself. Stupid stuff like this is why it's spreading.
 
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