College Debt Forgiveness

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by RandyForRubio, Jun 24, 2019.

  1. dalamon

    dalamon Well-Known Member 2018 Prediction Contest Winner

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    isn't usury considered to be a huge sin in Christianity?

    Makes you wonder why the fixation on this is absent while it isn't on...idk...abortion and homosexuality.

    --

    this is a much better plan than Warren's. Scores of other countries have figured out how to cover school from Pre-K to PhD but Americans are too busy climaxing to the thought of war that they can't figure it out themselves. There's scores of research comparing the debt load that current generations of Americans carry in comparison to the 80-90s (housing market, tuition cost, etc.) but if you're going to carry on with the myth of "greater things aren't possible!" then that's your prerogative.

    final note: this meme of "THIS BENEFITS RICH KIDS MOSTLY!" is beyond stupid, and asinine. Who's going to be paying most of the taxes to fund these sorts of programs?
     
    One Brow likes this.
  2. Rubashov

    Rubashov Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

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    That's pretty much what happens when a state subsidy is applied in return for poorly defined parameters, its basically what happens here with private health insurance which receives a government subsidy (of sorts you receive a tax rebate or penalty if you are a certain age and income and have or don't have private health cover, its a joke, private health schemes should more or less be abolished in my opinion.) the companies adjust their prices to the rebate and continue to raise prices on consumers.
     
  3. Rubashov

    Rubashov Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

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    Don't forget adultery that's a lot of fun. i honestly could never imagine America having properly free education, we used to have it and probably could have had it again during our last economic boom if the government had made sensible choices but tax cuts for the rich was more important. We have the HECS system or whatever they call it now, basically you end up owing the government a debt (the amount increases with CPI i think) and you pay it back once you earn over a certain amount, 55k I think. It actually ends up as a pretty good way to save money I continue to pay the higher tax rate like i did when I had a HECS debt so I can claim it back as a lump sum every financial year.
     
  4. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    In most parts of the country, there are at least two types of public housing assistance. There are directly subsidized, but there is also section 8. Landlords who rent section 8 properties are not limited from taking higher-income clients who do not qualify for section 8 assistance. However, many people would rather pay higher rents than live in properties that also have section 8 clients. So, the shortage of units is partly driven by this factor.
     
  5. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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  6. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    It is in Catholicism. They don't enforce it much.
     
    dalamon likes this.
  7. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    This reminds me.

    I had a boss who rented out some properties. He used to do section 8 bc it was guaranteed money, didn't have to worry about rent checks coming in late or not at all. He ended up stopping because the properties got wrecked, constantly.

    Anecdotal, of course, but it's not just that people don't want to live near section 8 inhabitants bc of socioeconomic status.
     
    Wes Mantooth likes this.
  8. candrew

    candrew Well-Known Member

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    The real question is why the **** is college that expensive in the first place.

    I graduated in 1994 and I paid about 300% less than what people pay today? Is the quality of education 300% better today? Doubt it. I paid for about 85% of my college education by working part-time during the school year and full time in the summer.

    The admin to student ratio has skyrocketed in the last 30 or so years. The government should audit these universities and refuse student loans to schools that will take government money to fund their bloated bureaucracies
     
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  9. NAOS

    NAOS Well-Known Member

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    Americans typically have the narrowest and least historically relevant views on debt.

    The student loan issue is nothing short of a crisis. Look at the amount of debt out there and then tell me that something drastic shouldn’t be done.

    And please stop pushing exceptional cases like on page 1, post number ****ing 2. We could barely wait a minute before chucking sand into the machine of Clear Thinking on this issue. Do better, franklin.
     
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  10. str8line

    str8line Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner

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    Where was that concern when they handed out even more tax cuts for the rich?
     
  11. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

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    So tax rates perfectly correlate with federal tax revenue?
     
  12. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    Bc universities were essentially told they could charge whatever they wanted when they found out that students could get guaranteed no caps federal school loans.

    Issa big problem. Short sighted "solution" to a problem without thinking of what might occur from that. AND PEOPLE WANT TO DO IT AGAIN!
     
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  13. Ron Mexico

    Ron Mexico Well-Known Member Contributor

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    College is still cheap at many places. It's the big name schools and out of state tuition prices that are crazy high. State universities in state tuition is still pretty reasonable.
     
  14. RandyForRubio

    RandyForRubio Well-Known Member

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    Totally.

    At my local school (which is a fine school, but it's just average overall) the in-state tuition is $7800/yr. The out of state tuition is $26k. 325% higher for out of state! Why would anybody do that if they don't have a scholarship?!

    The local 2 year program is $3400/yr.

    There are a bevy of affordable options, if one so chooses.
     
  15. silesian

    silesian Well-Known Member

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    who said that?
     
  16. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Agreed.

    Also actually working to pay for school seems to be an option no one considers anymore. When I went to college I worked a full 40+ hour work-week, including at least one overtime shift every week or 2, while attending full-time and my wife working part-time to take care of the kids. In that I completed a double-major (German with commercial emphasis along with logistics and operations management) which I then blew out into 2 degrees with minors in economics and international management. I did that in 5 years during which time we added 2 kids to our family, in addition to the 1 we had when I started.

    But since I worked through it all I only needed loans for about half of my school costs. Paid off those loans within 5 years or so after school. I had a lot of friends in college who did very similar to pay for their school. But It just seems like no one wants to put in the effort to do that now. I know my son says he can't afford to go to school because he would have to get so many loans, but when I ask him how much he could pay towards his own school he tells me he would have to quit working or switch to a barely part-time schedule to go to school. This is not a limited thing either. My daughter and her husband are mostly working their way through what expenses they have after scholarships, but she says very few of the people they know are doing the same thing.
     
  17. silesian

    silesian Well-Known Member

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    To see the impact of the tax credit you would have to compare home prices with the tax credit to home prices without the credit. Obviously, people can afford a more expensive house when they get a tax break.

    Since home prices have "always" been deductible, you can't make that comparison.

    The fact that rents and houses have both gone up or down due to some other exogenous factor has nothing to do with this issue.
     
  18. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    While I'm not really interested enough to do the research, I suppose a partial answer could be had by looking at the rate of increase in rents vs. the rate of increase in home prices. If they are basically the same, the tax credit would not be contributing much to the rate of increase.
     
  19. silesian

    silesian Well-Known Member

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    If it is in place both before and after the change, you cannot see the impact of the change. It is experimental design stuff, you know?
     
  20. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    A bias in absolute value does not imply a bias in change in value. That's also basic experimental design stuff.
     

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