Tough Day To Be In Law Enforcement


Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
I have heard people say that George should have simply listened to the police and shouldn't have had a criminal record. Insinuating that he got what he deserved.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app

I think he, as well as everyone, should listen to police and abide by their commands. This doesn't mean I think all policemen are good and mean well.

There's a YouTube channel I watch called, audit the audit that I find very educational and disturbing.

I hope everyone is informed enough to follow police orders for their own safety. You don't wanna gamble your life with a trigger happy cop who says he felt endangered.
 


Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I talked with a a few of them over at Ed Feser's a few months back.
What is ED Feser? I'm gonna have to Google that.

I'm talking personally. I'm sure there are some who know someone who condones George's murder, but they are very few idiots who do.
 

Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
It'd be just fine if police got mental illness training, but that's not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about non-police officers, unarmed, going to calls that are strictly mental illness help calls (no crime involved) without armed police there at all, and joining police on calls that clearly have a mental illness aspect but that also involve crimes and/or violence. Just because someone calls 911 doesn't mean police have to be involved.

I think we need to step back from the heavy handed (and often downright militaristic) policing that has become standard in the U.S. and especially so in poor urban neighborhoods.
I think in a perfect world this would be the case.

How would you justify sending someone like this who gets murdered by the mentally ill?
 

Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
I got paired up with a guy on the golf course who moved from California to Utah to get away from the CA politics who was trying to tell me the autopsy showed Floyd was already dying due to an overdose of some sort of tranquilizer while he was still in the back of the cop car. That he was at like 400% of the lethal dose and was saying he couldn't breathe before Chauvin even took him out of the car. No idea if any of that is true but he is the only person I've talked to that didn't think Chauvin should be in prison.

He was also trying to convince the group of gigantic Polynesians behind us of this and they were not having it. It was getting very uncomfortable.
Oof.

I've read things online that say something along the lines that he died because he had fentanly in his system.

Who the hell would fixate or use that and dismiss the fact of a cop putting their knee on someone's neck until they died?

Ignorant assholes are who.
 
Last edited:

LogGrad98

Well-Known Member
Contributor
I think in a perfect world this would be the case.

How would you justify sending someone like this who gets murdered by the mentally ill?
It would have to be a combo thing I think, and situational. And this absolutely would not preclude the need for better training for police officers.
 

Gameface

IT'S TIME TO GET YOUR GAMEFACE ON!
Contributor
2018 Award Winner
I think in a perfect world this would be the case.

How would you justify sending someone like this who gets murdered by the mentally ill?
Your second sentence... I don't know where to start, really. I understand the concern. What is hard for me is seeing the world through the lens that all 911 calls should be treated as potential murder traps.

"Hello, 911, I'm calling because my son has refused to take his medication for the last few days and now he won't leave his room and I'm worried that he might hurt himself. I don't know what else to do"

Mental health experts can respond to this call. If the situation seems too dangerous they back off and ask for armed police. Seems pretty straight forward to me. I don't have to justify them getting murdered. It's a possibility that some random **** happens tomorrow and I get murdered. I don't live my life on edge wanting to be prepared for every possible murder scenario above all common sense.

That's what I mean by our overly heavy handed policing. Where in poor, urban communities they treat almost everyone as if they are most likely trying to kill them, and as a result they kill people far far more often, people who didn't deserve to be killed, than they are killed.

Being a police officer is a bit down the list as the most dangerous job and most deadly job. The highly paid, highly trained, highly regarded pizza delivery drivers have that distinction. They face more danger than police, yet they don't gun you down as you're reaching for your wallet to give them a tip.

I don't want police to be killed. I don't want mental health experts to be killed. I don't want anyone to be killed. But we've skewed this WAY too far in the direction of protecting the shield (police officers) rather than the shield protecting us. Can you imagine body armor that killed the wearer because it had a vague suspicion that the wearer might wander into danger and the body armor kicked into self preservation mode? Police officers sign up to be our shield. They don't get to kill us out of a hyper paranoia about them being hurt. That's not the way this is supposed to work.
 

candrew

Well-Known Member
Found this interesting. Apparently the cops new weapon in preventing being filmed brutalizing people is..........The Beatles?

https://www.vice.com/en/article/bvx...beatles-to-trigger-instagram-copyright-filter

As VICE News reported Tuesday, police in Beverly Hills have repeatedly played copyrighted music while being filmed, seemingly in an attempt to trigger Instagram's algorithmic copyright filters, which could result in videos of police interactions with the public being taken down. Repeated infractions can result in the suspension of live streamers' accounts.
 

Top