Tough Day To Be In Law Enforcement

Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
Right, I wasn't trying to call you out at all, I was just saying that if common racist tropes weren't familiar to you then it's possible other racist incidents flew under your radar. I'm glad you've taken some time to educate yourself.
Bro, I grew up in a broken home, and dyslexic in Utah.

If you're gonna try and shame me for my ignorance of "boy" then it says more about you than me or my family you virtue signaling dude.

How dare my family not know a racist term because they weren't racist


Gtfoh
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member

These are the types of things that are going to become more commonplace with the level of racial tension in our country.
Disgusting. Arrest and prosecute.

but I can’t help but notice trump and Matt walsh have tweeted this video. I can’t help but wonder if there’s an agenda here. After all, the president wouldn’t be trying to distract, would he? Matt Walsh wouldn’t be trying to engage in whataboutism to distract from legitimate issues surrounding racism and police brutality, would he?

at any rate, no excuse to assault an employee. I hope they find those guys and prosecute him. Hope the employee is given a huge bonus. No one should endure that.
 

Ron Mexico

Well-Known Member
Contributor
Is anyone else asking yourself where all of these racist assholes are coming from? In my experience (obviously, take it for what it's worth) living in Utah, I can't think of hardly any people I'd say are openly or knowingly racist. I can think of a ton that are simple minded and ignorant/tone deaf of the issues at hand. Like, they honestly treat others and see others as the same, no matter the color and so they take issue with some of the narrative. That doesn't, imo, make them racist and call for condemnation or make Utah such a terrible place. It means Utahn's are ignorant to issues they're foreign to.

I think understanding and educating people from all walks of life goes way further with actually helping society than condemning others - unless it's coming from the extreme of extreme who can go **** themselves e.g. white supremacists/any hate group.

I hope what I'm saying makes sense cause I know someone is gonna be a virtue signaler and say I'm so dumb. Predictable.
I've seen it a bunch in Utah. I was a truck driver and I also managed a mechanic shop. I was shocked what people said and how aggressively they stuck to it. There are a lot more of it. Once I heard them talking it was much easier to here other people talking more subtle in public and realize what they meant. When I grew up in Provo the N word was common and normal, I'm not that old. Utah has lots of racism a lot of it stemming from LDS which has a long racist history.
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
I've seen it a bunch in Utah. I was a truck driver and I also managed a mechanic shop. I was shocked what people said and how aggressively they stuck to it. There are a lot more of it. Once I heard them talking it was much easier to here other people talking more subtle in public and realize what they meant. When I grew up in Provo the N word was common and normal, I'm not that old. Utah has lots of racism a lot of it stemming from LDS which has a long racist history.
I grew up in Orem so basically Provo and I agree with this. The thing that shocked me was moving to a part in Sandy. We would hear all the time about “those people” or “that type of community” and “so glad we live in a white and wholesome neighborhood.” (Not joking this was actually said at a school community council). So even when the n word isn’t used, the overt racism is just stunning.

I served for 2 years in community council and I remember once bringing up during a meeting the need for greater outreach to our middle and lower income families as all the school community council members were white and very affluent. Obviously, not all populations of our school community were being represented so I had hoped this would helpful and we could discuss ways for greater outreach.

I ran into a buzz saw as several members argued and basically said, “well they know when these meetings are so maybe those people just don’t want to join. We all have to make sacrifices and so if those people want to join then they too need to make sacrifices.” It was bad. Eye opening. To be fair, a few members agreed with me and said that they’d update the website and send some emails out. But I was surprised at the comments others members were making and the general refusal to want to include others.

Then again it shouldn’t have surprised me. It wasn’t until 1979 that the LDS church permitted blacks to have the priesthood. So most of the adults in the room had grown up believing that blacks were inferior to whites. It takes time for these prejudices to be eliminated.
 
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Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
I've seen it a bunch in Utah. I was a truck driver and I also managed a mechanic shop. I was shocked what people said and how aggressively they stuck to it. There are a lot more of it. Once I heard them talking it was much easier to here other people talking more subtle in public and realize what they meant. When I grew up in Provo the N word was common and normal, I'm not that old. Utah has lots of racism a lot of it stemming from LDS which has a long racist history.
I'm not gonna argue you this at all. My step mom, from Mississippi, once called one of my best friends the n word while he was hiding in the garage. As a kid, it broke me. I wasn't allowed to wear hats in my home nor was I allowed to have friends at my house.

The few times I snuck a friend home, this happened.


My experience with people from Provo isn't what I experienced.

The religion you speak of was 100% racist but never once taught me racism but love. People **** on Mormons but name me 1 other religion that's evolving like them?

Maybe I'm drunk.
 

AlaskanAssassin

Well-Known Member
Disgusting. Arrest and prosecute.

but I can’t help but notice trump and Matt walsh have tweeted this video. I can’t help but wonder if there’s an agenda here. After all, the president wouldn’t be trying to distract, would he? Matt Walsh wouldn’t be trying to engage in whataboutism to distract from legitimate issues surrounding racism and police brutality, would he?

at any rate, no excuse to assault an employee. I hope they find those guys and prosecute him. Hope the employee is given a huge bonus. No one should endure that.
I understand the skepticism considering who is sharing this content, but I think everyone needs to move past this way of thinking. We need to just review information ourselves and be able to critically think and analyze situations. We don't need Cenk Uygur, Ben Shapiro, Kyle Kulinksi, Matt Walsh, etc. to tell us how to think. These people are just entertainers. Hopefully we are all trying to listen to a variety of people and perspectives to avoid group think.

That being said, I think it's fair to ask why this video has received virtually no national news coverage. Isn't this a blatantly racist attack? The attacker and guy holding the phone admitted as much on Twitter. Remember, media companies are businesses first, and they are making too much money off the racial unrest to jeopardize it by sharing these types of stories.
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
I understand the skepticism considering who is sharing this content, but I think everyone needs to move past this way of thinking. We need to just review information ourselves and be able to critically think and analyze situations. We don't need Cenk Uygur, Ben Shapiro, Kyle Kulinksi, Matt Walsh, etc. to tell us how to think. These people are just entertainers. Hopefully we are all trying to listen to a variety of people and perspectives to avoid group think.

That being said, I think it's fair to ask why this video has received virtually no national news coverage. Isn't this a blatantly racist attack? The attacker and guy holding the phone admitted as much on Twitter. Remember, media companies are businesses first, and they are making too much money off the racial unrest to jeopardize it by sharing these types of stories.
It’s not so much skepticism of the content (although if Macy’s/law enforcement hasn’t investigated it they should). It’s my skepticism Of the motives of Shapiro, Walsh, and Trump sharing it. We all know they don’t give a damn about that employee. They’re all looking to change the BLM narrative right now and distract from Trump’s flailing re-election campaign.

Let’s not fall for it.
 

Catchall

Well-Known Member
2019 Prediction Contest Winner
You're right. I should have been taught "boy" was racist when I was a kid.

I was being hyperbolic.

Burn the witch

I'm gonna log out now
I always thought "boy" was a Southern expression and that it wasn't racially charged. I guess it is. The most I ever heard it was from the Fog Horn Leg Horn cartoon character.

 

JimLes

Well-Known Member
People **** on Mormons but name me 1 other religion that's evolving like them?
You do realize there are religions out there ordaining women, LGBTQ people, supporting a woman's right to choose, and hold a myriad other progressive views.

I mean, the freaking Catholic Church modified the Catholic Catechism 2 years ago to say "the Church teaches, in the light of the Gospel, that the death penalty is inadmissible because it is an attack on the inviolability and dignity of the person, and she works with determination for its abolition worldwide."

Compare that to "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints regards the question of whether and in what circumstances the state should impose capital punishment as a matter to be decided solely by the prescribed processes of civil law. We neither promote nor oppose capital punishment."

That's like saying you neither oppose nor promote police brutality. You're just neutral.
 

Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
I always thought "boy" was a Southern expression and that it wasn't racially charged. I guess it is. The most I ever heard it was from the Fog Horn Leg Horn cartoon character.

I was so ignorant of it until this happened.


I think I've started a number of my YouTube videos out by saying, "yeah boy."
I had no idea the term boy was racist until I googled this.Do I delete them? I had zero intention saying anything racist yet someone like The Thriller is gonna call me a racist because of it.
 

Catchall

Well-Known Member
2019 Prediction Contest Winner
I was so ignorant of it until this happened.

I think I've started a number of my YouTube videos out by saying, "yeah boy."
I had no idea the term boy was racist until I googled this.Do I delete them? I had zero intention saying anything racist yet someone like The Thriller is gonna call me a racist because of it.
I wouldn't worry about it at this point. If you didn't have any ill intent, I'm sure that comes through.
 

Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
You do realize there are religions out there ordaining women, LGBTQ people, supporting a woman's right to choose, and hold a myriad other progressive views.

I mean, the freaking Catholic Church modified the Catholic Catechism 2 years ago to say "the Church teaches, in the light of the Gospel, that the death penalty is inadmissible because it is an attack on the inviolability and dignity of the person, and she works with determination for its abolition worldwide."

Compare that to "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints regards the question of whether and in what circumstances the state should impose capital punishment as a matter to be decided solely by the prescribed processes of civil law. We neither promote nor oppose capital punishment."

That's like saying you neither oppose nor promote police brutality. You're just neutral.
Funny how none of my mormon friends are saying that.

Zero of them.
 

Beer

Well-Known Member
I understand the skepticism considering who is sharing this content, but I think everyone needs to move past this way of thinking. We need to just review information ourselves and be able to critically think and analyze situations. We don't need Cenk Uygur, Ben Shapiro, Kyle Kulinksi, Matt Walsh, etc. to tell us how to think. These people are just entertainers. Hopefully we are all trying to listen to a variety of people and perspectives to avoid group think.

That being said, I think it's fair to ask why this video has received virtually no national news coverage. Isn't this a blatantly racist attack? The attacker and guy holding the phone admitted as much on Twitter. Remember, media companies are businesses first, and they are making too much money off the racial unrest to jeopardize it by sharing these types of stories.
I saw it on a few sites, but I'm sure a lot of news outlets are just shying away from it because they don't want to be branded as siding with the guy that allegedly said the N word. Although as we all know beating the crap out of someone is far worse than calling someone a name.
 

Engorged On Unborn Gore

Well-Known Member
Funny how none of my mormon friends are saying that.

Zero of them.
Those personal examples may be meaningful to you, and that's great. But the overarching history of the Church, and especially in Utah, is a hand-in-hand agreement with white supremacy and institutional racism.

If you are going to look at those you know today and reason backwards through time, you are going to remain ignorant of what Utah is and where it has been. We are talking about a place where it was legal to own slaves and had whites-only establishments. We are talking about a religion that prefers whiteness and "fair skin" on the scriptural level. The changing of laws did not erase attitudes, it merely caused the residents to change the ways they expressed their racism.

Here is an excerpt of an interview of Chieko Okazaki about her experience of Utah:

--
...
But anyway, what I see in this world today is that we forget who we are and where we came from....When I first came to Utah in 1950, I noticed that most people didn’t know that there was more than the white race. I came as an exchange teacher. My husband did his graduate work while I was doing this. People didn’t know how to take me—not my education status, but more who I was. I looked different. They wondered whether I could possibly be like them and whether I could teach their children, being Japanese. There were three parents who said they didn’t want their children to be taught by me. But I had a very, very great principal. She was way ahead of her time, in relation to acceptance of different peoples and acceptance of their traditions and ideas. So she accepted me, just like that (snapping fingers), when she saw me. She was so grateful that I was placed in her school. She said to these reluctant parents, “That will be fine,” and she transferred those students to another second-grade class.

I thought many of the parents would feel the same way—not knowing my skills and my qualifications. I used to sew during those days, and I made a fuchsia dress. I had very black hair, and the fuchsia really looked dramatic with my hair, and then I topped it off by putting a f lower in my hair. All three of us second-grade teachers opened the door to the schoolyard that first day, and I saw many parents standing there with their children. I knew how unusual that was. Of course, parents bring their children to kindergarten and often for a few days in first grade, but for second-graders to have parents come—that was really a message. I was pretty sure that they came to see who I was.

The other two teachers said, “Why don’t you call your children first?” I said, “That will be fine.” I just said, “I’m very happy to be here in this wonderful school and to be a part of this society here and to work with your children. I’ll start calling the names of the children, and you come up and form a line and I’ll take you to the classroom.” So I said, “James Backman.” He came running up. I said, “Goll, you just had a haircut, didn’t you?” I put my hand on his hair. He said, “Yes, I did.” I said, “Well, you look really great." He said, “I want you to know that my dad is the president of the Salt Lake Board of Education.” I said, “Oh, that’s nice to know.” I called the name of the next child: “Beth Benson.” She came up, I said, “Beth, you have beautiful hair. I love your braids.” (I found something positive to comment about with each child.) Beth said, “My daddy is an apostle in the Church.” I said, “Oh, yes, that’s nice to know.” And so it went. Each child’s parents were heads of this and heads of that. I thought, “What a class I’m going to have! Thirty-five children of very important parents.”

So I took my class in; and within a few days, those three women went to the principal and asked if their children could be returned to my class. The principal looked at them and said, “Well, you know, opportunity just knocks once. I’ve already changed them to another class. I’ve had three other children take the places of your children.” The principal then came running down and told me what had happened. She was really a great advocate and friend.

I’m telling that story to illustrate that Utah really was something of a closed society in many ways. It was difficult for many of the Saints here to really get to know others and to accept people who were not of their race. Of course, one of the best things that happened was the missionary program. When the missionaries were sent out into the different parts of the world, they began loving the people they worked with. This broadened their scope of understanding about what all human beings have in common. They began to understand the concept of “Other sheep I have which are not of this fold” (3 Ne. 15:21). But Ed and I just accepted that, where the older generation was concerned, there would still be some prejudice and some feeling of “you’re not as good as I am.” I remember that one of the really hurtful things that I heard soon after we moved here was: “If you were not born under the covenant, you can never enter the kingdom of Heaven.” I’d sit in church, listening to that, and I’d think, “How do you account for the people who are converts to the Church? How in the world can I be in this church?”

My principal used to be on the Sunday School General Board. She came in one day and said, “Chieko, do you realize that I fought for you yesterday?” I said, “You did?” “Yes. In my class, they talked about people who are not born under the covenant—that they will not be able to enter the kingdom of Heaven.” I said, “You’ve heard that, too?” “Yes, and I fought for you. I said, ‘Do you mean to tell me that Chieko, who is a convert, will not be eligible for the kingdom of heaven?’ And the teacher said, ‘That’s right. That’s the doctrine.’” Anyway, we don’t hear things like that anymore, and it definitely isn’t the doctrine. But that’s what we’ve progressed from. That’s why I think people of my generation—white members of the Church—always have a little bit of a problem with racial prejudice. They don’t talk about it, and it certainly has mellowed; but I’m sure if they had to make a choice in relation to their child or grandchildren marrying into another race, they’d have hard feelings about it and might try to stop it.

I remember when I was a student at the University of Hawaii during World War II, one of the apostles of the Church at our stake conference spoke. I was a member of the Japanese Branch, and of course we all went, although I have to say it was hard for us to go to the tabernacle, because everybody else was white people. We felt that we were intruding somehow. Many servicemen were present, and this apostle said very bluntly, “I want all of you soldiers to know that you are not to get into the situation where you would like to be married to any of these people. And you women, you are not to get to the point of integrating yourself to the point where you think you are going to be married to one of these men. Each of these men has a person waiting for him in one of the wards in the city they come from.”

I remember how surprised I was. It was a completely new topic to me, and maybe it was a problem for some of the older young adults there. I’d never dated in high school, because I was focusing on my education. In fact, I didn’t date in college until I was a sophomore. So to me, that wasn’t a problem. But I thought, “Why is it that the Church doesn’t look upon us, who are of a different race, as worthy to marry a white Mormon man? If we are daughters and sons of God, I don’t think the Lord would look at us and say, ‘You’re different, so there are things you can’t do.’” I realized that I was still learning about the gospel, but that was a contradiction that I tucked into the back of my mind. I had to think more about the contradictions when Ed and I moved to Utah. (Ed was Japanese, like me.) One of our friends was marrying a white person, and they could not get married in the temple because the state had what was called a “Mongoloid law.” They had to go to Canada to get married in the Cardston Temple. That was in 1951. I remember thinking about that scripture when the Lord said, “Other sheep I have which are not of this fold,” and I could understand that, where ethnicity was concerned, I really was not of this fold.

So Ed and I really could have left the Church here in Utah. What I understood as the gospel message didn’t match what we encountered so often with the people. There was a big gap in so many ways. Again, my mother’s wisdom helped. She said, “Know that you know the truth”—she wasn’t a Mormon. She was a Buddhist until she died—“and others haven’t learned it yet. So just hold fast and let the rest go.” So that’s what we did. We just held on and tried to look at the doctrines of the gospel rather than how people behaved sometimes, and believed that our Father in Heaven and Jesus Christ would not look at us as any different from white members.

For a long time, we weren’t asked to serve in any Church callings. But I’m glad to say that when our wards got to know us and realized that we could contribute, we were asked to serve. My husband got his degree in social work at the University of Utah. He worked for the American Red Cross for a while, and then with the Veterans Administration as a psychiatric social worker. Then he became the first director of aging for the whole state of Utah. Then he was offered an excellent position with the government in Denver. That’s when we moved to Colorado. We found a different climate, a lot more openness. We had neighbors of all religions, including Jews. So there we were, Mormons, and we just were part of it. But even the Mormons had a lot more openness about them. I noticed that right away. We felt free to associate with one another and talk openly about things that we couldn’t bring up in Utah. I remember in Utah that a few times Ed and I tried to express our feelings about some of the things we noticed, and we got a pretty stiff response, like: “Whoa! Are you trying to change our attitude?” So we quickly learned never to discuss the questions we had about the gospel and how we were treated. But in Denver as I listened to other people and the way they talked about things, I thought, “Well, in this society, I probably could.”
 

Jazz4ever

Well-Known Member
It’s not so much skepticism of the content (although if Macy’s/law enforcement hasn’t investigated it they should). It’s my skepticism Of the motives of Shapiro, Walsh, and Trump sharing it. We all know they don’t give a damn about that employee. They’re all looking to change the BLM narrative right now and distract from Trump’s flailing re-election campaign.

Let’s not fall for it.
If they get mere slaps on the wrist for it....it's a problem.
 
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