Derek Chauvin Murder Trial


fishonjazz

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The media has reported extensively on Floyd's past to justify his killing, but what about Chauvin's past? Seems to me like his past is at least as relevant as Floyd's. Derek Chauvin served for 19 years and had 18 complaints and 16 of which were closed w/o any discipline (which we all know means they swept under the rug by the union). Not only was he still on the force, he was TRAINING when he killed George Floyd. Even with all of the video evidence, we're mostly all shocked that he was actually found guilty. If there hadn't been any video evidence, does anyone think he would have even been brought to trial?

How many others did Chauvin abuse in his 19 year career that we don't know of?

Chauvin isn't a good dude. He exemplifies the problem in our system. 18 complaints in 19 years and was a trainer. Is this really the best we can do?

As for complaints I need more context. Like if chauvin pulled me over for speeding and I was in fact speeding and he gave me the appropriate ticket and told me to have a good day could I still call and complain about him simply cause I was pissed that I got a ticket I deserved?

Is 1 complaint per year way more or way less than is typical for a police officer?
I don't know what a normal amount of complaints would be.
When citizens deal with cops it's usually not for something fun and awesome so maybe even good cops get lots of complaints. Idk.

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Eenie-Meenie

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I think the Columbus killing of the 16-year-old adds support to my contention that police need to use other than deadly force in situations. As was stated by the NAACP, why wasn't a taser used, why weren't other methods used to de-escalate the situation, how did the girl threaten the life of the police officer? This is another example of police shooting first and asking questions later, another example of policing done wrong and deadly.
 

Archie Moses

Well-Known Member
I'm shocked I tell you shocked that Tucker Carlson is disappointed in the verdict. Who could have foreseen him defending the white cop who killed a black man? It's almost like he's a white supremacist!

And his laugh? Sounds like the Joker at :15. He laughs like the Joker before cancelling someone he disagreed with. I thought the right hated cancel culture?

What a douche.
 

candrew

Well-Known Member
I believe she was actively trying to stab 2 people when she was shot. So yeah, a lot more to the situation.

If I have a line this must be it. The cop quite possibly saved 2 girls lives. I get it, it's a ****** situation - she was just a kid. It sounds like she had a tough life and she clearly had issues.

But come on, she is trying to kill another human being. Does that person's life not matter?
 

The Thriller

Well-Known Member
As for complaints I need more context. Like if chauvin pulled me over for speeding and I was in fact speeding and he gave me the appropriate ticket and told me to have a good day could I still call and complain about him simply cause I was pissed that I got a ticket I deserved?

Is 1 complaint per year way more or way less than is typical for a police officer?
I don't know what a normal amount of complaints would be.
When citizens deal with cops it's usually not for something fun and awesome so maybe even good cops get lots of complaints. Idk.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
Although I agree more context is necessary, the article I included provided an account from one of those who complained about Chauvin:

Melissa Borton, told the Los Angeles Times she filed one of the complaints in August 2007 that ended with a formal letter of reprimand against Chauvin.

Borton said Chauvin and another officer pulled her over as she was returning home from the grocery store with her infant. The officers approached her car, reached inside “without a word,” unlocked her door, pulled her out, and put her in the back of a police cruiser, she said.

She told the newspaper that Chauvin and the other officer released her roughly 15 minutes later without an explanation.

The reason for the traffic stop? Borton had been driving 10 miles over the speed limit. Records obtained by the Times said that Chauvin was later told that he “did not have to remove complainant from car.”
That sounds pretty excessive. And had there been video evidence posted to social media of the incident, I wonder if there would have been a greater outrage? I’d like to know the content of the other complaints. But this seems pretty bad.

And:
The Minneapolis Police Department hasn’t released any details about the complaints or why they were closed.
Of course. Gee, why be transparent when you can just tell the public to shut the **** up or else?

Again, the original PD statement is attached below. I think it's pretty safe to say that this PD has shown the willingness to omit important details to the public about the conduct of its officers:

If the PD want to restore trust in their officers, maybe they should release details about these complaints to the public? Again, this is part of the problem I have with our system. PDs aren't transparent and they merely serve to protect themselves. How is this protecting and serving anybody when they allow officers to harass, exploit, and kill and their department rushes to sweep things under the rug?

Can’t we do better? Raise standards? Increase transparency and accountability? Limit the power of the unions? Focus more on social work and less on incarceration?
 
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Beer

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I think the Columbus killing of the 16-year-old adds support to my contention that police need to use other than deadly force in situations. As was stated by the NAACP, why wasn't a taser used, why weren't other methods used to de-escalate the situation, how did the girl threaten the life of the police officer? This is another example of police shooting first and asking questions later, another example of policing done wrong and deadly.

She was like 6" away from someone trying to stab them. Do you just not understand at all how reality works?
 

Beer

Well-Known Member
If I have a line this must be it. The cop quite possibly saved 2 girls lives. I get it, it's a ****** situation - she was just a kid. It sounds like she had a tough life and she clearly had issues.

But come on, she is trying to kill another human being. Does that person's life not matter?

Sure her life matters. But the other girls she was trying to stab take precedence over hers in that moment.
 

framer

Well-Known Member
So now Lebron James is tweeting photos of the officer involved in stopping the knife attack saying that "he's next."
 

TheGoldStandard

Well-Known Member
She was like 6" away from someone trying to stab them. Do you just not understand at all how reality works?
Yep. Cops are trained to be prepared to shoot a knife suspect within 21 feet of the cop or a potential victim. The principle being that someone can get to you in 1.5 seconds with a knife, which is less time than it takes an average cop to draw and fire unaimed shots. When cases like this get protested, it lessens the effect of cop actions that should not happen in any circumstance.

Not that I agree with the 21 foot rule per se, as cops often have their weapons drawn already in this situation, but it is important for cops to protect themselves and others, and have some protection in split second decisions. In the above video, I think the cop didn't do anything "wrong", and if my kid was being attacked by a knife wielder, I hope the cop would do what is needed to project my kid.

I will be the first to say that there are many bad cops, I have been treated poorly by a few. Cops often make demands they have no right to make, and use power to try and make you do whatever they want. It needs to stop. That said, cops have a dangerous job, and have to make split secomd decisions. I will usually side with a cop from not being charged criminally in a split second life or death situation that cops deal with every day if the cop didn't create the situation that caused the shooting (regardless of what Charles Barkley says, the no-knock Brianna Taylor thing was on the cops too, what do they expect breaching in a home unidentified).

A guy I went to high school with was very drunk and his dad called the cops on him. He had a gun with him and a cop "talked him down" and convinced him to come outside with his hands up. He did, with a gun in his hand raised straight in the air. The cops (he was surrounded) ordered him to put the gun down. He started to comply, and they shot him 20 times because they felt threatened. It was ruled a justified shooting even though he was following directions. If you tell a suspect to do something, and you shoot them for it, you should not be a cop.

Then there are situations like this where cops, searching for a suspect, went into a residents back yard and mistook the resident (who was in the yard armed due to someone breaking onto their property) was shot and killed by the police. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna1257131

Or the dog that was shot and killed after an officer in SLC climbed over a private fence looking for a little girl.

What is not emphasized by the media is the number of cops that are killed every year. It is a tough job, and good officers have my respect and sympathy.
 
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The Thriller

Well-Known Member
Yep. Cops are trained to be prepared to shoot a knife suspect within 21 feet of the cop or a potential victim. The principle being that someone can get to you in 1.5 seconds with a knife, which is less time than it takes an average cop to draw and fire unaimed shots. When cases like this get protested, it lessens the effect of cop actions that should not happen in any circumstance.

Not that I agree with the 21 foot rule per se, as cops often have their weapons drawn already in this situation, but it is important for cops to protect themselves and others, and have some protection in split second decisions. In the above video, I think the cop didn't do anything "wrong", and if my kid was being attacked by a knife wielder, I hope the cop would do what is needed to project my kid.

I will be the first to say that there are many bad cops, I have been treated poorly by a few. Cops often make demands they have no right to make, and use power to try and make you do whatever they want. It needs to stop. That said, cops have a dangerous job, and have to make split decisions. I will usually side with a cop from not being charged criminally in a split second life or death situation that cops deal with every day if the cop didn't create the situation that caused the shooting (regardless of what Charles Barkley says, the no-know Brianna Taylor thing was on the cops too, what do they expect breaching in a home unidentified).

A guy I went to high school with was very drunk and his dad called the cops on him. He had a gun with him and a cop "talked him down" and convinced him to come outside with his hands up. He did, with a gun in his hand raised straight in the air. The cops (he was surrounded) ordered him to put the gun down. He started to comply, and they shot him 20 times because they felt threatened. It was ruled a justified shooting even though he was following directions. If you tell a suspect to do something, and you shoot them for it, you should not be a cop.

Then there are situations like this where cops, searching for a suspect, went into a residents back yard and mistook the resident (who was in the yard armed due to someone breaking onto their property) was shot and killed by the police. Or the dog that was shot and killed after an officer in SLC climbed over a private fence looking for a little girl.

What is not emphasized by the media is the number of cops that are killed every year. It is a tough job, and good officers have my respect and sympathy.
We hear about how cops are killed and how tough the job is every time. Outside of the military, there isn't another profession that's worshipped as much by our society. I don't think that's the problem.

What's not emphasized by the media is the number of incidents the cops necessarily escalate each year.
Couldn't one argue that in many cases, death could be avoided if the police weren't involved? Especially for non-violent traffic and drug issues? Think about some of the most high profile killings. Did we really need police to get involved with:

George Floyd: Counterfeit $20 dollar bill
Philando Castile: Traffic stop
Eric Garner: Selling cigarettes
Ronell Foster: Riding a bike without a light
Michael Brown: Stealing cigars
Breona Taylor: Watching tv at home

Why are we bringing the police into these situations? Why are we killing people over $20 bucks and selling cigarettes?

One thing the media doesn't emphasize enough, is how this brutal system affects whites too. Why are we sending the police to escalate situations and execute fellow citizens?
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