Emperor Obama

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by babe, May 18, 2020.

  1. NAOS

    NAOS Well-Known Member

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    The executive branch can do nothing but contort itself (read: become corrupted) when Congress is in partisan deadlock. The core problem here comes down to all that is fueling the corruption of Party Politics. **** still has to get done, but through these gambits now.

    The bigger scandal between Obama’s executive orders and what the DNC did to Bernie (one example among many in both parties)? Easily the latter.
     
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  2. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

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    Although I have always seen "America" as a social frontier with actual opportunity for the poor, the dispossessed, the downtrodden and the political refugees from counties already ossified with Establishment Power, and love the hope of a Constitutional Republic built on federalism..... the splitting or sharing of power geographically towards the nearest possible governance, with lots of checks and balances against any concentration of power at any level...….

    I just want you to know your opinion here is dead right.

    The reality we have now is "The Club" as perhaps generally cultivated by the Council on Foreign Relations, which invites new members and provides indoctrinating speakers to monthly meetings, provides a leading magazine I subscribe to and read, and opportunities for social and business networking. And a sort of code of behavior. Non-attribution. You're not supposed to carry gossip about others in the club. Someone grossly violated that code when they took a video, by phone most likely, of Joe Biden bragging about how he school Ukraine into submiission, and let it loose publicly. I bet that person lost his membership, for life.

    The CFR is a sort of glue that makes Establishment Dems and Republicans a sort of UniParty.

    Trump even went to the national CFR chief and sought support for his candidacy. But with a radical departure from the general globalism of the day like MAGA, he drew fire instead.

    I share the concern expressed above in several posts about Trump also exceeding his Constitutional authority, as he has done in signing some unconstitutional legislation and in trade dealing and the PanPanic measures.
     
  3. NAOS

    NAOS Well-Known Member

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    This is the babe I like. Legendary babe.
     
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  4. sirkickyass

    sirkickyass Moderator Emeritus Staff Member

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    Somehow it only gets crazier.
     
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  5. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    Remember that opinion is generally from people who cannot fathom that other people would disagree with them, so there is no way any rational person would vote against their guy, hence there is no way their guy will ever lose and when they do it is a shock and awe situation that needs to be corrected for the good of the nation.
     
  6. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    How is this quantified? To me it has seemed he is more bluster than action and really hasn't done that much. Most of his focus has been on undoing. Has he issued more executive orders than any other president? I didn't see him in that infographic.
     
  7. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    I don't recall any other President being so disruptive regarding various inspector generals, and similar positions designed to check Presidential power.
     
  8. LogGrad98

    LogGrad98 Well-Known Member Contributor

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    I see that too, but I am not sure that qualifies as "no one has done it more". Recency bias a bit maybe?
     
  9. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    It's entirely possible. The only scandal I can recall that comes close is Nixon firing the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General because they refused to for the special prosecutor, before he found Bork to do the the job. I'm sure there were some things earlier on, but the Presidency overall had much less power then.
     
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  10. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

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    Things can be viewed in all kinds of crazy ways.

    I should like to somehow get you to see. You can hardly make a difference going on being duped and used by the powers that be.

    While I am not sure exactly what the truth really is about other people, I would hope I could be free to act for myself, and that others would do so as well within their rights.

    For sure, if we don't prosecute high officials who egregiously violate our laws, the only "rule of law" we can have is what philosophers refer to as "The Arrogance of Power."
     
  11. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

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    Obama is famous for his legislative claim to power through his pen. He also did a significantly increased job of expanding bureaucracy with people he figured would do his program. While Trump has cut some regulations he does the emperoric swagger quite well. The reason "Establishment: sorts of both parties hate him is because if he is not reducing governance he is building a counter-Establishment they can't expect to run in his wake.
     
  12. One Brow

    One Brow Well-Known Member

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    Unless Congress gets some laws passed quickly, any position Trump has set a precedent for by firing someone is a position whose person can be fired again.
     
  13. sirkickyass

    sirkickyass Moderator Emeritus Staff Member

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    Which "philosopher" writes about the "Arrogance of Power"

    Google comes back with an ex US Senator who's got a pretty weird set of ideas: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._William_Fulbright
     
  14. Archie Moses

    Archie Moses Well-Known Member

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    To me, Obama was the most likable president. He was down to earth and relatable.
     
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  15. infection

    infection Well-Known Member Staff Member 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I think if you were to meet any of these presidents at, say, a JFC get together, or shoot the breeze while watching a game, the most affable is certainly Clinton.
     
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  16. Archie Moses

    Archie Moses Well-Known Member

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    I'd probably like any president if I had the chance to meet them. Trump is pushing it though. Dude is so crazy he's entertaining.
     
  17. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I always thought I would enjoy george bush the most in a setting like you are describing.
    Clinton would probably be pretty fun and easy going too though.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
     
  18. Beer

    Beer Well-Known Member

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    I'd blaze on with Bush, Obama, or Clinton. All seem pleasant enough.
     
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  19. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

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    I feel like Obama would be a little too classy/well behaved for me. He couldn't keep up with me.

    Bush and Clinton would probably be tons of fun though. I would worry about being able to keep up with them.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
     
  20. babe

    babe Well-Known Member

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    Neither the President nor the Senate will support any law passed by this House of that sort.

    There is a massive public sentiment against establishing unelected Executive Branch officials beyond the reach of an elected President, especially considering all the leaks and establishment opposition to chqanges the voters have been supporting since the Tea Party began showing resistance to the The Establishment.

    oh, I dunno. Who the hell knows what Trump and McConnell will do, since it's looking more and more like they're the patsies of the Establishment themselves.

    I think the SES system needs to be cleared entirely, and the "legislative" and "judicial" functions of Executive Branch agencies drawn and quartered and sent to the four corners of the Republic.
     

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