CHINA vs the NBA.

Discussion in 'Utah Jazz' started by yamers, Oct 6, 2019.

  1. checkbookdoc

    checkbookdoc Well-Known Member

    378
    260
    83
    Feb 28, 2017
    Funny, I keep hoping for the opposite.
     
  2. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

    1,272
    189
    113
    May 27, 2010
    Fair enough. I guess it depends on what someone is referring to when they say "free speech".
     
  3. framer

    framer Well-Known Member

    5,613
    1,784
    228
    Jun 24, 2010
    Except for free speech used to be a cultural expectation in the United States. This right here is complete bullcrap. Did people think that authoritarians wouldn't eventually lay hold of the "Cancel Culture" they so lovingly fashioned as a cudgel to beat those they disagreed with? No. We have a history of people being able to say controversial things and push the boundaries. Sometimes it is good, like the civil rights movement, sometimes it sucks, like the Eugenics crap, most of the time it means nothing, like Justin Bieber fandom.

    What we have here is ANOTHER government punishing Americans for their speech. It is NOT remotely OK or understandable.
     
    Douchebag K likes this.
  4. checkbookdoc

    checkbookdoc Well-Known Member

    378
    260
    83
    Feb 28, 2017
    @AlaskanAssassin, I find your signature quote about individual rights to be in contrast to what seems to be your stance that the HK protesters should not be supported. Am I misunderstanding you?
     
    AlaskanAssassin likes this.
  5. framer

    framer Well-Known Member

    5,613
    1,784
    228
    Jun 24, 2010
    All this being said, the fact that Haywood's shoe contract is suspended made me guffaw just a little. Perhaps that was the point of the whole thing.

    "Wait, who authorized those Christmas shoes!? Can this be stopped!?

    Lower level staffer- "I've got a plan. Let me call my contact in the government."

    But really. When the Hayward Christmas shoes come out, I plan on boycotting China by not buying them.
     
    fishonjazz likes this.
  6. fishonjazz

    fishonjazz Well-Known Member Contributor 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

    54,615
    10,206
    388
    Nov 4, 2010
    No, you did that.
    I saw a post saying that violence is never the answer and responded by saying that sometimes it is and provided one example.

    Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using JazzFanz mobile app
     
    AlaskanAssassin likes this.
  7. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

    1,272
    189
    113
    May 27, 2010
    I have enormous respect for the people of Hong Kong that are protesting. I ABSOLUTELY support their right to protest. I hope a solution can be found that is acceptable to the people of Hong Kong that minimizes any more casualties.

    I think it's laughable that Americans assume that our values (freedom of speech, religion, democracy) should be adopted by the entire world. I wish we would look in the mirror before assuming that we know what is best for everyone.

    To me, the situation is much more nuanced than people realize, starting with the fact that HK was part of a unified China for for 2,000 years prior to being forcefully taken in battle by the British. Are we able to at least contemplate why furthering the division between China and Hong Kong might upset the people of mainland China and it's government? No one seems to want to look at the situation for a different perspective. I've been to China twice (LOVE IT), read as much as I can on the topic, talked to Chinese people in the US who were raised or recently lived in Hong Kong and Beijing (I work in a CPA firm that has lots of these folks) and I barely feel like I understand what is going on.

    I posted earlier some data that indicated 70% of HK people were in favor of the One Country, Two Government system. I have a hard time believing that this has significantly changed due to the recent events. Maybe I'm wrong.
     
    Ron Mexico, jom2003 and fishonjazz like this.
  8. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

    1,272
    189
    113
    May 27, 2010
    Sorry, I didn't see the full line of discussion.
     
    fishonjazz likes this.
  9. infection

    infection Well-Known Member Staff Member 2019 Award Winner 2018 Award Winner

    11,470
    8,257
    428
    May 27, 2010
    I agree with you. But I don't believe that's relevant in this situation. This isn't about exporting democracy to China -- it's about preservation of Hong Kong's way of life. The only culture that's being imposed here is by the Chinese government on Hong Kong.

    Again, all of these things happened long before any of the parties involved were ever born. Who does this affect more? Hong Kong changing their way of life, or China thinking that something belongs to them? Which one will impact individuals lives more on a day to day basis? Think about what you're saying. China not being able to lay claim to Hong Kong affects the average Chinese person how much? China laying claim to Hong Kong affects the average HKer how much? I can tell you that the answer to one of those questions is much larger than the other. If we were to take this template and apply it elsewhere, does the template hold up and make sense? Let's say slavery. Sure, you could find some upset descendants of white plantation owners who feel that it was unjust that their 'property' was taken from them, and emphasize some heavy nuance on how we don't understand how complicated things are and how descendants of plantation owners have some legitimate gripe. So? Perhaps that's too extreme. How about the revolutionary war? Lots of British thought the colonies were theirs. So? Should the US revert back to England, way after the fact, because they believe it was ultimately theirs, that started colonization, and that the rebellion was unjust? Does any of that history mean **** to people today?

    Should Hong Kong lay down their way of life because nearly 200 years ago "this belonged to China for a really long time"? Ok. Some land was part of the Chinese empire. How about the people -- alive now -- who weren't way back when this happened? What about them?
     
  10. Handlogten's Heros

    Handlogten's Heros Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

    19,682
    9,390
    393
    Jun 13, 2014
    Was just thinking the NBA was headed for a great season... completely open field... tons of exciting young stars and some established superstars... and then this is how they start off... all because of a damn tweet. Momentum is fragile sometimes.
     
  11. ChicAggie

    ChicAggie Member

    91
    89
    18
    Jun 21, 2019
    If it neither tilts the playing field in favor of or against the Jazz, I really couldn't care less if the NBA has less revenue as a result of a beef with China. If through some unanticipated consequence the Jazz are affected adversely or positively vis-a-vis the rest of the league, then I suddenly care.
     
  12. JimLes

    JimLes Well-Known Member

    2,607
    1,108
    193
    Sep 20, 2010
    You're starting with the most irrelevant "fact." What happened a 100, 150, or 2000 years ago is irrelevant to possible solutions to today's problems.
     
  13. jom2003

    jom2003 Well-Known Member

    1,103
    298
    133
    May 24, 2014
    You know that not everyone in Hongkong are separatists right? Like everyday there is some anti-Trump rally going on somewhere, does it mean that we should let those who do not support the Trump administration start a revolutionary war on us or gain independence from the United States? The illusion over this whole situation in Hongkong is that even if there are one million people in China that wants something collectively as a group, it still won't make up to 1% of the entire Chinese population(more like 0.07%). There simply are way too many people in that coutry and it is impossible to keep everyone happy. That is why I agree with AlaskanAssasin's idea that different systems work better for different countries. Let's not automatically assume that US way is the right way to go for every country in this world. It has been proven time and time again that it isn't.
     
    AlaskanAssassin likes this.
  14. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

    1,272
    189
    113
    May 27, 2010
    What was the point of the "One Country, Two System" agreement? Again, I'll point out data that in 2016, 70% of people in Hong Kong approved of the "One Country, Two System" government. It sure feels like the tone of "HK Supporters" in the US want them to be independent from China. That's not even what they are asking for.

    Rather than trying to understand what the protesters are asking for, or what the majority of HK citizens want, we immediately try to interject our values into a culture of people that we don't truly understand.
     
  15. jom2003

    jom2003 Well-Known Member

    1,103
    298
    133
    May 24, 2014
    Sadly, neither is Tiananmen Square. Most of people in China nowadays are pro-government. Period. They don't care about freedom of speech, they don't care about democracy. People in China were never taught these values. All they can see is the quality of lives improving dramatically over the past two decades. That is what they care the most about. Of course there are a good portion of them, like the richest of the rich, who would pursue something more. But they are not the majority. Not even close. There is no "crisis" or massive "refugees" trying to flee China right now, unlike when Tiananmen square happened.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019 at 4:07 PM
  16. jom2003

    jom2003 Well-Known Member

    1,103
    298
    133
    May 24, 2014
    People talk as if everyone in HongKong wants democracy, independence or both. That is not anywhere close to the truth. HongKong as a state is divided amongst themselves. With a good portion of the local citizens being pro Communists. Those just were never reported in the US news media. Even the protesters themselves are divided into the peaceful ones and violent rioters. But even if everyone in HongKong can come together to try to accomplish something as a group, it still won't make up to 1% of the entire Chinese population. Much less than those anti-Trump protesters.
     
    AlaskanAssassin likes this.
  17. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

    1,272
    189
    113
    May 27, 2010
    So the rich and complex history of China is not relevant in understanding this situation and the perspectives of those involved (along with potential solutions)? It's certainly important to them, why shouldn't we understand it before imposing our values on them? Chinese people are very conscious of their history. Ask someone from China how they feel about Japan, despite those atrocities happening 80 years ago.
     
  18. Handlogten's Heros

    Handlogten's Heros Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

    19,682
    9,390
    393
    Jun 13, 2014
    I will join the boycott #standwithframer
     
  19. Handlogten's Heros

    Handlogten's Heros Well-Known Member 2019 Award Winner

    19,682
    9,390
    393
    Jun 13, 2014
    Also, this is great... I wish no harm on Hayward, but the fact that he went to Boston for notoriety and ends up with Anta and they suspend his contract is great. Meanwhile DM selling a buttload of his signature shoes with one of the big shoe companies.
     
  20. AlaskanAssassin

    AlaskanAssassin Well-Known Member

    1,272
    189
    113
    May 27, 2010
    This is spot on. Not everyone in the world wants a government similar to the United States. We need to stop treating other countries like we know what is best for them.
     
    Ellipse and JazzGal like this.

Share This Page